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OECD Imports: Diversification and quality search


  • Céline CARRERE

    () (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International(CERDI))

  • Olivier CADOT

    () (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International(CERDI))

  • Vanessa STRAUSS-KHAN
  • Madina KUKENOVA


This paper explores the evolution of OECD imports over time and as a function of income levels, measuring the concentration of those imports across origin countries at the product level. We find evidence of diversification followed, in the very last years of the sample period (post-2000), by a slight reconcentration. This reconcentration is entirely explained by the growing importance of Chinese products in OECD imports. We also find evidence of relatively more volatile concentration levels for differentiated goods, consistent with a simple model of adverse selection and screening of suppliers by OECD buyers. Finally, we find that “accession” to OECD markets occurs directly (rather than after acquiring prior export experience on other markets) for more than half of the (extra-OECD) exporter/product pairs, but that one to eight years of experience enhances subsequent survival on OECD markets. Exports that reach OECD markets after more than eight years of experience elsewhere tend to survive less.

Suggested Citation

  • Céline CARRERE & Olivier CADOT & Vanessa STRAUSS-KHAN & Madina KUKENOVA, 2009. "OECD Imports: Diversification and quality search," Working Papers 200909, CERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1055

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Parteka, 2013. "The evolving structure of Polish exports (1994−2010) – diversification of products and trade partners," Bank i Kredyt, Narodowy Bank Polski, vol. 44(5), pages 435-466.
    2. Parteka, Aleksandra & Tamberi, Massimo, 2013. "Product diversification, relative specialisation and economic development: Import–export analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 121-135.
    3. Patrick Georges, 2012. "Trade Diversification Away from the U.S. or North American Customs Union? A Review of Canada’s Trade Policy Options," Working Papers 1205E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    Import diversification; International trade; OECD;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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