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The Impact of Transmission Pricing in Network Industries

  • Ruderer, D.
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    The allocation of scarce transmission resources has a considerable impact on investment incentives in network industries. We study the long term effects of two common network management regimes on investment in production and transmission facilities. In one case transmission constraints are directly taken into account through locationally differentiated market prices (simultaneous market clearing). In the other case, a uniform market price is implemented and transmission constraints are resolved in a subsequent congestion market (sequential market clearing). While simultaneous market clearing produces the efficient outcome, sequential market clearing leads to overinvestment in generation and transmission capacity, as we show. These findings contribute to the debate on electricity transmission pricing.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe1230.pdf
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    Paper provided by Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge in its series Cambridge Working Papers in Economics with number 1230.

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    Date of creation: 07 Jun 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:1230
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/index.htm

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    1. Gabszewicz, J.J. & Poddar, S., . "Demand fluctuations and capacity utilization under duopoly," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1269, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    2. Bushnell, James B. & Stoft, Steven E., 1997. "Improving private incentives for electric grid investment," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 85-108, March.
    3. Sauma, Enzo E. & Oren, Shmuel S., 2009. "Do generation firms in restructured electricity markets have incentives to support social-welfare-improving transmission investments?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 676-689, September.
    4. Boom, Anette, 2009. "Vertically integrated firms' investments in electricity generating capacities," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 544-551, July.
    5. de Frutos, María-Ángeles & Fabra, Natalia, 2011. "Endogenous capacities and price competition: The role of demand uncertainty," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 399-411, July.
    6. Vincent Rious & Jean-Michel Glachant & Philippe Dessante, 2010. "Transmission Network Investment as an Anticipation Problem," RSCAS Working Papers 2010/04, European University Institute.
    7. Reynolds, Stanley S. & Wilson, Bart J., 2000. "Bertrand-Edgeworth Competition, Demand Uncertainty, and Asymmetric Outcomes," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 122-141, May.
    8. Natalia Fabra & Nils‐Henrik M von der Fehr & María‐Ángeles de Frutos, 2011. "Market Design and Investment Incentives," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 121(557), pages 1340-1360, December.
    9. Karsten Neuhoff & Benjamin F. Hobbs & David Newbery, 2011. "Congestion Management in European Power Networks: Criteria to Assess the Available Options," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1161, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Schaber, Katrin & Steinke, Florian & Hamacher, Thomas, 2012. "Transmission grid extensions for the integration of variable renewable energies in Europe: Who benefits where?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 123-135.
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