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Transmission Network Investment as an Anticipation Problem

Author

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  • Vincent Rious
  • Jean-Michel Glachant
  • Philippe Dessante

Abstract

This paper proposes a probabilistic model to evaluate if a proactive TSO that anticipates the connection of new generators with short construction duration compared to the time needed to reinforce the network is more efficient than a reactive TSO that does not make any anticipation but that may then face higher congestion while the network is being reinforced. This evaluation is made in presence of anticipation costs both related to the study of the project of network investment and to the administrative procedures needed to obtain the building agreement. Our results in terms of social costs clearly show a limit of probability for the connection of generators beyond which a proactive TSO is more efficient than a reactive TSO. Evaluated on realistic cases of connection, this limit of probability is found quite low, which indicates that the proactive behaviour for a TSO shall generally be the optimal one.

Suggested Citation

  • Vincent Rious & Jean-Michel Glachant & Philippe Dessante, 2010. "Transmission Network Investment as an Anticipation Problem," RSCAS Working Papers 2010/04, European University Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsc:rsceui:2010/04
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    File URL: http://cadmus.eui.eu/dspace/bitstream/1814/13081/1/RSCAS_2010_04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Boyle, Glenn & Guthrie, Graeme & Meade, Richard, 2006. "Real Options and Transmission Investment: the New Zealand Grid Investment Test," Working Paper Series 3846, Victoria University of Wellington, The New Zealand Institute for the Study of Competition and Regulation.
    2. Finon, Dominique & Perez, Yannick, 2007. "The social efficiency of instruments of promotion of renewable energies: A transaction-cost perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 77-92, April.
    3. McLaren Loring, Joyce, 2007. "Wind energy planning in England, Wales and Denmark: Factors influencing project success," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2648-2660, April.
    4. Roques, Fabien A. & Newbery, David M. & Nuttall, William J., 2008. "Fuel mix diversification incentives in liberalized electricity markets: A Mean-Variance Portfolio theory approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1831-1849, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Höffler, Felix & Wambach, Achim, 2013. "Investment Coordination in Network Industries: The Case of Electricity Grid and Electricity," EWI Working Papers 2013-12, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln (EWI).
    2. Groppi, Angelamaria & Fumagalli, Elena, 2014. "Network expansion by a proactive transmission system operator: A case study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 610-623.
    3. Ruderer, D., 2012. "The Impact of Transmission Pricing in Network Industries," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1230, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Leonardo Meeus, 2014. "Offshore grids for renewables: do we need a particular regulatory framework?," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/24, European University Institute.
    5. Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik & Schröder, Sascha Thorsten, 2012. "Curtailment of renewable generation: Economic optimality and incentives," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 663-675.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liberalised power system; Transmission Network; Planning; Investment; Anticipation;

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