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Understanding the success of London’s schools

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  • Simon Burgess

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Abstract

This paper contributes to understanding the ‘London Effect’, focussing on the role of the ethnic composition. The aim is to understand the statistical contribution to the London premium of ethnic composition. I also analyse data on the performance of recent immigrants. The results confirm that pupil progress on standard measures is significantly higher than the rest of England, 9.8% of a standard deviation. This is entirely accounted for by ethnic composition. The last decade of results shows the same result. I show that for other measures of attainment, the London premium is halved but remains significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Burgess, 2014. "Understanding the success of London’s schools," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/333, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:14/333
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    File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2014/wp333.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deborah Wilson & Simon Burgess & Adam Briggs, 2011. "The dynamics of school attainment of England’s ethnic minorities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 681-700, April.
    2. Asako Ohinata & Jan C. van Ours, 2013. "How Immigrant Children Affect the Academic Achievement of Native Dutch Children," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 308-331, August.
    3. Ohinata, Asako & van Ours, Jan C., 2011. "How Immigrant Children Affect the Academic Achievement of Native Dutch Children," IZA Discussion Papers 6212, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson & Adam Briggs & Anete Piebalga, 2008. "Segregation and the Attainment of Minority Ethnic Pupils in England," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/204, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. Charlotte Geay & Sandra McNally & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2013. "Non‐native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What Are the Effects on Pupil Performance?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0, pages 281-307, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eyles, Andrew & Hupkau, Claudia & Machin, Stephen, 2016. "School reforms and pupil performance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 9-19.
    2. Simon Burgess & Robert Metcalfe & Sally Sadoff, 2016. "Understanding the Response to Financial and Non-Financial Incentives in Education: Field Experimental Evidence Using High-Stakes Assessments," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 16/678, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    3. Anders, Jake & Burgess, Simon & Portes, Jonathan, 2018. "The Long-Term Outcomes of Refugees: Tracking the Progress of the East African Asians," IZA Discussion Papers 11609, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Stephen Gorard & Nadia Siddiqui, 2019. "How Trajectories of Disadvantage Help Explain School Attainment," SAGE Open, , vol. 9(1), pages 21582440188, January.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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