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A Simple Model of Learning Styles

Author

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  • Gervas Huxley
  • Mike Peacey

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Abstract

Much of the economic literature on education treats the process of learning as a `black box'. While such models have many interesting uses, they are of little use when a college seeks advice about reallocating resources from one input to another (e.g. from lecture hours to seminars). Commenting on such questions requires us to `open up' the black box. This paper shows what one such model would look like by explicitly modelling how students vary in their `learning styles'. We apply this framework to investigate how reforms to higher education (e.g. MOOCs) would affect students with different learning styles.

Suggested Citation

  • Gervas Huxley & Mike Peacey, 2014. "A Simple Model of Learning Styles," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 14/322, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:14/322
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    File URL: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cmpo/publications/papers/2014/wp322.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Human Capital; Education Production Function; Learning Style; Independent Learner; MOOC;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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