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International banking and liquidity risk transmission: lessons from the United Kingdom

Author

Listed:
  • Hills, Robert

    () (Bank of England)

  • Hooley, John

    () (International Monetary Fund)

  • Korniyenko, Yevgeniya

    () (International Monetary Fund)

  • Wieladek, Tomasz

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

This paper forms the United Kingdom’s contribution to the International Banking Research Network’s project examining the impact of liquidity shocks on banks’ lending behaviour, using proprietary bank-level data available to central banks. Specifically, we examine the impact of changes in funding conditions on UK-resident banks’ domestic and external lending from 2006–12. Our results suggest that, following a rise in the liquidity shock measure, UK-resident banks that grew their balance sheets quicker relative to their peers pre-crisis, decreased their external lending by more relative to other banks, and increased their domestic lending. When we account for country of ownership, we find that the same pattern was true for both UK-owned and foreign-owned banks, but more pronounced for UK-owned banks’ domestic and foreign-owned banks’ external lending. These results are robust to splitting the data into real and financial sector lending, the use of more granular bilateral country loan data and controlling for the various banking system interventions made by governments in 2008–09.

Suggested Citation

  • Hills, Robert & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2015. "International banking and liquidity risk transmission: lessons from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 562, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0562
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bankofengland.co.uk/-/media/boe/files/working-paper/2015/international-banking-and-liquidity-risk-transmission-lessons-from-the-uk.pdf?la=en&hash=AAF6A568D3F9506717B0C9FC4180CAD09946FB96
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francis, William B. & Osborne, Matthew, 2012. "Capital requirements and bank behavior in the UK: Are there lessons for international capital standards?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 803-816.
    2. Andrew K. Rose & Tomasz Wieladek, 2014. "Financial Protectionism? First Evidence," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(5), pages 2127-2149, October.
    3. Murphy, Emma & Senior, Stephen, 2013. "Changes to the Bank of England," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(1), pages 20-28.
    4. Bridges, Jonathan & Gregory, David & Nielsen, Mette & Pezzini, Silvia & Radia, Amar & Spaltro, Marco, 2014. "The impact of capital requirements on bank lending," Bank of England working papers 486, Bank of England.
    5. Banerjee, Ryan N. & Mio, Hitoshi, 2018. "The impact of liquidity regulation on banks," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 35(PB), pages 30-44.
    6. Aiyar, Shekhar, 2011. "How did the crisis in international funding markets affect bank lending? Balance sheet evidence from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 424, Bank of England.
    7. Davies, Richard & Richardson, Peter & Katinaite, Vaiva & Manning, Mark, 2010. "Evolution of the UK banking system," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 50(4), pages 321-332.
    8. Cornett, Marcia Millon & McNutt, Jamie John & Strahan, Philip E. & Tehranian, Hassan, 2011. "Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 297-312, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Khemais Zaghdoudi & Abdelaziz Hakimi, 2017. "The Determinants of Liquidity Risk: Evidence from Tunisian Banks," Journal of Applied Finance & Banking, SCIENPRESS Ltd, vol. 7(2), pages 1-5.
    2. Sheng Huang & Jonathan Williams & Ru Xie, 2017. "The Future of Money: Liquidity co-movement between financial institutions and real estate firms: evidence from China," Working Papers 17004, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity shock; global financial crisis; cross-border and domestic lending.;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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