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How did the crisis in international funding markets affect bank lending? Balance sheet evidence from the United Kingdom

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  • Aiyar, Shekhar

    () (Bank of England)

Abstract

Evidence abounds on the propagation of financial stresses originating in the US mortgage market to banking systems worldwide through international funding markets. But the transmission of this external funding shock to the real economy via bank lending is surprisingly underexamined, given the central importance ascribed to this channel of contagion by policymakers. This paper provides evidence of this transmission for the UK-resident banking system, the largest in the world by asset size. It uses a novel data set, created from detailed and confidential balance sheet data reported by individual banks quarterly to the Bank of England. I find that the shock to foreign funding caused a substantial pullback in domestic lending. The results are derived using a range of instruments to correct for endogeneity and omitted variable bias. Foreign subsidiaries and branches reduced lending by a larger amount than domestically owned banks, while the latter calibrated the reduction in domestic lending more closely to the size of the funding shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Aiyar, Shekhar, 2011. "How did the crisis in international funding markets affect bank lending? Balance sheet evidence from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 424, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0424
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Allen, William A. & Moessner, Richhild, 2012. "The international propagation of the financial crisis of 2008 and a comparison with 1931," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(02), pages 123-147, August.
    2. Temesvary, Judit, 2015. "Foreign activities of U.S. banks since 1997: The roles of regulations and market conditions in crises and normal times," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 202-222.
    3. Hills, Robert & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2015. "International banking and liquidity risk transmission: lessons from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 562, Bank of England.
    4. Andrew K. Rose & Tomasz Wieladek, 2011. "Financial Protectionism: the First Tests," NBER Working Papers 17073, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Andrea F. Presbitero & Gregory F. Udell & Alberto Zazzaro, 2014. "The Home Bias and the Credit Crunch: A Regional Perspective," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 53-85, February.
    6. Aiyar, Shekhar & Calomiris , Charles W & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2012. "Does macropru leak? Evidence from a UK policy experiment," Bank of England working papers 445, Bank of England.
    7. David Cobham & Yue Kang, 2012. "Financial Crisis And Quantitative Easing: Can Broad Money Tell Us Anything?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 80, pages 54-76, September.
    8. Joyce, Michael & Spaltro, Marco, 2014. "Quantitative easing and bank lending: a panel data approach," Bank of England working papers 504, Bank of England.
    9. Shekhar Aiyar & Romain A Duval & Damien Puy & Yiqun Wu & Longmei Zhang, 2013. "Growth Slowdowns and the Middle-Income Trap," IMF Working Papers 13/71, International Monetary Fund.
    10. Ralph Haas & Iman Lelyveld, 2014. "Multinational Banks and the Global Financial Crisis: Weathering the Perfect Storm?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 333-364, February.
    11. Shekhar Aiyar & Sonali Jain-Chandra, 2012. "The Domestic Credit Supply Response to International Bank Deleveraging; Is Asia Different?," IMF Working Papers 12/258, International Monetary Fund.
    12. Enders, Zeno & Peter, Alexandra, 2015. "Global Banking, Trade, and the International Transmission of the Great Recession," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113022, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    13. Al-Saffar, Yaser & Ridinger, Wolfgang & Whitaker, Simon, 2015. "Financial Stability Paper No 24: The role of external balance sheets in the financial crisis," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 24, Bank of England.
    14. Shekhar Aiyar, 2012. "From Financial Crisis to Great Recession: The Role of Globalized Banks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 225-230, May.
    15. Nicolas Arregui & Jaromir Benes & Ivo Krznar & Srobona Mitra & Andre O Santos, 2013. "Evaluating the Net Benefits of Macroprudential Policy; A Cookbook," IMF Working Papers 13/167, International Monetary Fund.
    16. Hoggarth, Glenn & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya, 2013. "Financial Stability Paper No 22: Which way do foreign branches sway? Evidence from the recent UK domestic credit cycle," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 22, Bank of England.
    17. Lorenzo Sasso, 2016. "Bank Capital Structure and Financial Innovation: Antagonists or Two Sides of the Same Coin?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 66/LAW/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    18. Scopelliti, Alessandro Diego, 2013. "Off-balance sheet credit exposure and asset securitisation: what impact on bank credit supply?," MPRA Paper 43890, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Düwel, Cornelia, 2013. "Repo funding and internal capital markets in the financial crisis," Discussion Papers 16/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    20. Samira Hellou, 2018. "Term structure of bank flows to emerging countries: what effects of short- vs. long-term regulatory arbitrage are?," EconomiX Working Papers 2018-23, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    21. Berrospide, Jose M. & Herrerias, Renata, 2015. "Finance companies in Mexico: Unexpected victims of the global liquidity crunch," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 33-54.
    22. Shekhar Aiyar & Charles W. Calomiris & Tomasz Wieladek, 2015. "How to Strengthen the Regulation of Bank Capital: Theory, Evidence, and A Proposal," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 27(1), pages 27-36, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Liquidity shock; transmission mechanism; bank lending; instrumental variables.;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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