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What have we learned from recent financial crises and policy responses?

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  • William R. White

Abstract

This paper draws some policy lessons from recent financial crises. Three forms of financial instability are distinguished: short-term volatility, medium-term misalignments including excessive international capital flows, and contagion across both markets and countries. Some underlying factors contributing to each form of instability are identified and specific public policies are recommended to help alleviate each.

Suggested Citation

  • William R. White, 2000. "What have we learned from recent financial crises and policy responses?," BIS Working Papers 84, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:84
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert N. McCauley & William R. White, 1997. "The Euro and European financial markets," BIS Working Papers 41, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Murray, J. & Van Norden, S. & Vigfusson, R., 1996. "Excess Volatility and Speculative Bubbles in the Canadian Dollar: Real of Imagined?," Technical Reports 76, Bank of Canada.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivan Baboucek & Martin Jancar, 2005. "Effects of Macroeconomic Shocks to the Quality of the Aggregate Loan Portfolio," Working Papers 2005/01, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    2. Bastidon, Cécile & Gilles, Philippe & Huchet, Nicolas, 2008. "The international lender of last resort and selective bail-out," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 144-152, June.
    3. Hassapis, Christis & Kalyvitis, Sarantis, 2002. "On the propagation of the fluctuations of stock returns on growth: is the global effect important?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 487-502, August.
    4. Schmidt Paul-Günther, 2001. "Ursachen systemischer Bankenkrisen: Erklärungsversuche, empirische Evidenz und wirtschaftspolitische Konsequenzen," ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, De Gruyter, vol. 52(1), pages 239-280, January.
    5. Andrew CORNFORD, 2000. "Commentary On The Financial Stability Forum’S Report Of The Working Group On Capital Flows," G-24 Discussion Papers 7, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    6. Hartmann, Daniel & Kempa, Bernd & Pierdzioch, Christian, 2008. "Economic and financial crises and the predictability of U.S. stock returns," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 468-480, June.
    7. Haile, Fasika & Pozo, Susan, 2008. "Currency crisis contagion and the identification of transmission channels," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 572-588, October.
    8. Gaa, Charles & Stephen Lumpkin & Robert Ogrodnik & Peter Thurlow, 2001. "The Future Prospects for National Financial Markets and Trading Centres," Staff Working Papers 01-10, Bank of Canada.

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