IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bdr/region/226.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Movilidad social en el Pacífico colombiano

Author

Listed:
  • Jhorland Ayala García

Abstract

El Pacífico colombiano es una de las regiones con las peores condiciones de vida para sus habitantes. En este documento se estudia la movilidad social intergeneracional con base en datos de la Encuesta Nacional de la Protección Social del 2012 y la Encuesta Nacional de Calidad de Vida de 2011. Por medio de matrices de transición e indicadores de movilidad basados en regresiones, se encuentra que la región tiene menor movilidad social que el promedio nacional; esta movilidad es mayor para los jefes de hogar que para los cónyuges, especialmente si son mujeres. Las minorías étnicas registraron mayor movilidad social que su contraparte, aunque en términos generales la región se encuentra en desventaja. Se encontró, además, que el Pacífico presenta una situación desventajosa en todos los factores que determinan la movilidad social intergeneracional.

Suggested Citation

  • Jhorland Ayala García, 2015. "Movilidad social en el Pacífico colombiano," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 226, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:region:226
    DOI: 10.32468/dtseru.226
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.32468/dtseru.226
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roland Benabou & Efe A. Ok, 2001. "Social Mobility and the Demand for Redistribution: The Poum Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 447-487.
    2. Solon, Gary, 1992. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, June.
    3. Ana María Ibañez & Andrés Moya, 2010. "Do Conflicts Create Poverty Traps? Asset Losses and Recovery for Displaced Households in Colombia," NBER Chapters, in: The Economics of Crime: Lessons for and from Latin America, pages 137-172, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Christopher T. Whelan, 1999. "Social Mobility in Ireland in the 1990s - Evidence from the 1994 Living in Ireland Survey," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 30(2), pages 133-158.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Julio E. Romero-Prieto, 2016. "Población y desarrollo en la periferia colombiana en el siglo XX," Revista Economía y Región, Universidad Tecnológica de Bolívar, vol. 10(1), pages 7-50, June.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4994 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. John Hassler & José Rodríguez Mora & Joseph Zeira, 2007. "Inequality and mobility," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 235-259, September.
    3. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/eu4vqp9ompqllr09iak4384sp is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Silvia Mendolia & Peter Siminski, 2016. "New Estimates of Intergenerational Mobility in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 92(298), pages 361-373, September.
    5. Gilles Le Garrec, 2011. "Redistribution and the cultural transmission of the taste for fairness," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2011-24, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    6. Vera Tolstova, 2021. "Voting on Education and Redistribution Policies in the U.S: Does Endogenous Fertility Matter?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp681, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    7. Markus Jäntti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2013. "Income Mobility," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 607, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Le Garrec, Gilles, 2013. "Guilt aversion and redistributive politics: A moral intuitionist approach," Economics Discussion Papers 2013-53, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    9. Thomas Siedler & Bettina Sonnenberg, 2012. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility and Preferences for Redistribution," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 510, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Carol Graham & Stefano Pettinato, 2001. "Happiness, Markets, and Democracy: Latin America in Comparative Perspective," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 237-268, September.
    11. David Card & John DiNardo & Eugena Estes, 2000. "The More Things Change: Immigrants and the Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 227-270, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Sato, Hiroshi & Li, Shi, 2007. "Class Origin, Family Culture, and Intergenerational Correlation of Education in Rural China," IZA Discussion Papers 2642, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Jung-In Jo & Hyun Jin Choi, 2019. "Enigmas of grievances about inequality: Effects of attitudes toward inequality and government redistribution on protest participation," International Area Studies Review, Center for International Area Studies, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, vol. 22(4), pages 348-368, December.
    14. Christopher Hoy & Franziska Mager, 2019. "Why are relatively poor people not more supportive of redistribution? Evidence from a survey experiment across 10 countries," Working Papers 489, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    15. Senik, Claudia, 2009. "Direct evidence on income comparisons and their welfare effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 408-424, October.
    16. Viviane Azevedo & Cesar Bouillon, 2009. "Social Mobility in Latin America: A Review of Existing Evidence," Research Department Publications 4634, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    17. Christelis, Dimitris & Dobrescu, Loretti I. & Motta, Alberto, 2020. "Early life conditions and financial risk-taking in older age," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 17(C).
    18. Jo Blanden, 2019. "Intergenerational income persistence," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 176-176, January.
    19. Sokbae Lee & Oliver Linton & Yoon-Jae Whang, 2009. "Testing for Stochastic Monotonicity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(2), pages 585-602, March.
    20. Anderson, Michael L. & Lu, Fangwen & Zhang, Yiran & Yang, Jun & Qin, Ping, 2016. "Superstitions, street traffic, and subjective well-being," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 1-10.
    21. Maia Güell & Michele Pellizzari & Giovanni Pica & José V. Rodríguez Mora, 2018. "Correlating Social Mobility and Economic Outcomes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 353-403, July.
    22. István György Tóth & Keller, T., 2011. "GINI DP 7: Income Distributions, Inequality Perceptions and Redistributive Claims in European Societies," GINI Discussion Papers 7, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    movilidad social; matrices de transición; movilidad educativa; región Pacífica.Note:;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bdr:region:226. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/brcgvco.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Clorith Angélica Bahos Olivera (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/brcgvco.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.