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International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Canada

Listed author(s):
  • H. Evren Damar
  • Adi Mordel

We study how changes in prudential requirements affect cross-border lending of Canadian banks by utilizing an index that aggregates adjustments in key regulatory instruments across jurisdictions. We show that when a destination country tightens local prudential measures, Canadian banks lend more to that jurisdiction, and the effect is particularly significant when capital requirements are tightened and weaker if banks lend mainly via affiliates. Our evidence also suggests that Canadian banks adjust foreign lending in response to domestic regulatory changes. The results confirm the presence of heterogeneous spillover effects of foreign prudential requirements.

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File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/swp2016-34.pdf
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Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Staff Working Papers with number 16-34.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 2016
Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:16-34
Contact details of provider: Postal:
234 Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G9, Canada

Phone: 613 782-8845
Fax: 613 782-8874
Web page: http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/

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  1. Jose M Berrospide & Ricardo Correa & Linda S Goldberg & Friederike Niepmann, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from the United States," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 435-476, March.
  2. Niepmann, Friederike, 2015. "Banking across borders," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 244-265.
  3. Eugenio Cerutti & Ricardo Correa & Elisabetta Fiorentino & Esther Segalla, 2017. "Changes in Prudential Policy Instruments - A New Cross-Country Database," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 477-503, March.
  4. Matthieu Bussière & Julia Schmidt & Frédéric Vinas, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from France," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 163-193, March.
  5. Joel F. Houston & Chen Lin & Yue Ma, 2012. "Regulatory Arbitrage and International Bank Flows," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 67(5), pages 1845-1895, October.
  6. Rocco Huang & Lev Ratnovski, 2009. "Why Are Canadian Banks More Resilient?," IMF Working Papers 09/152, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Aiyar, Shekhar & Calomiris, Charles W. & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2014. "The international transmission of bank capital requirements: Evidence from the UK," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(3), pages 368-382.
  8. Akinci, Ozge & Olmstead-Rumsey, Jane, 2015. "How Effective are Macroprudential Policies? An Empirical Investigation," International Finance Discussion Papers 1136, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  9. Jana Ohls & Marcus Pramor & Lena Tonzer, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Germany," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 129-162, March.
  10. Bremus, Franziska & Fratzscher, Marcel, 2015. "Drivers of structural change in cross-border banking since the global financial crisis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 32-59.
  11. Mathias Drehmann & Claudio Borio & Kostas Tsatsaronis, 2011. "Anchoring Countercyclical Capital Buffers: The role of Credit Aggregates," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(4), pages 189-240, December.
  12. James Chapman & Halil Evren Damar, 2015. "International Banking and Liquidity Risk Transmission: Evidence from Canada," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(3), pages 455-478, November.
  13. Aiyar, Shekhar & Calomiris, Charles & Hooley, John & Korniyenko , Yevgeniya & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2014. "The international transmission of bank capital requirements: evidence from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 497, Bank of England.
  14. David Xiao Chen & H. Evren Damar & Hani Soubra & Yaz Terajima, 2012. "Canadian Bank Balance-Sheet Management: Breakdown by Types of Canadian Financial Institutions," Discussion Papers 12-7, Bank of Canada.
  15. Shekhar Aiyar & Charles W. Calomiris & Tomasz Wieladek, 2014. "Does Macro‐Prudential Regulation Leak? Evidence from a UK Policy Experiment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 181-214, 02.
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