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Cross-border effects of prudential regulation: evidence from the euro area

Author

Listed:
  • Żochowski, Dawid
  • Franch, Fabio
  • Nocciola, Luca

Abstract

We analyse the cross-border propagation of prudential regulation in the euro area. Using the Prudential Instruments Database (Cerutti et al., 2017b) and a unique confidential database on balance sheets items of euro-area financial institutions we estimate panel models for 248 banks from 16 euro-area countries. We find that domestic banks reduce lending after the tightening of capital requirements in other countries, while they increase lending when loan-to-value (LTV) limits or reserve requirements are tightened abroad. We also find that foreign affiliates increase lending following the tightening of sector-specific capital buffers in the countries where their parent banks reside and that bank size and liquidity play a role in determining the magnitude of cross-border spillovers. JEL Classification: G21, F34, F36

Suggested Citation

  • Żochowski, Dawid & Franch, Fabio & Nocciola, Luca, 2019. "Cross-border effects of prudential regulation: evidence from the euro area," Working Paper Series 2285, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20192285
    Note: 2152671
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    File URL: https://www.ecb.europa.eu//pub/pdf/scpwps/ecb.wp2285~dee118ef49.en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jose M Berrospide & Ricardo Correa & Linda S Goldberg & Friederike Niepmann, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from the United States," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 435-476, March.
    2. Eugenio Cerutti & Ricardo Correa & Elisabetta Fiorentino & Esther Segalla, 2017. "Changes in Prudential Policy Instruments - A New Cross-Country Database," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 477-503, March.
    3. Aiyar, Shekhar & Calomiris, Charles W. & Hooley, John & Korniyenko, Yevgeniya & Wieladek, Tomasz, 2014. "The international transmission of bank capital requirements: Evidence from the UK," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(3), pages 368-382.
    4. Jana Ohls & Marcus Pramor & Lena Tonzer, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Germany," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 129-162, March.
    5. Bremus, Franziska & Fratzscher, Marcel, 2015. "Drivers of structural change in cross-border banking since the global financial crisis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 32-59.
    6. Danisewicz, Piotr & Reinhardt, Dennis & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon, 2017. "On a tight leash: Does bank organizational structure matter for macroprudential spillovers?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 174-194.
    7. Diana Bonfim & Sónia Costa, 2017. "International Banking and Cross-Border Effects of Regulation: Lessons from Portugal," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 13(2), pages 341-377, March.
    8. Reinhardt, Dennis & Sowerbutts, Rhiannon, 2015. "Regulatory arbitrage in action: evidence from banking flows and macroprudential policy," Bank of England working papers 546, Bank of England.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ambrocio, Gene & Hasan, Iftekhar & Jokivuolle, Esa & Ristolainen, Kim, 2020. "Are bank capital requirements optimally set? Evidence from researchers’ views," Research Discussion Papers 10/2020, Bank of Finland.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cross-border spillovers; international banking; prudential policy;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration

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