IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bca/bocawp/10-12.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Financial Stress, Monetary Policy, and Economic Activity

Author

Listed:
  • Fuchun Li
  • Pierre St-Amant

Abstract

This paper examines empirically the impact of financial stress on the transmission of monetary policy shocks in Canada. The model used is a threshold vector autoregression in which a regime change occurs if financial stress conditions cross a critical threshold. Using the financial stress index developed by Illing and Liu (2006) as a measure of the Canadian financial stress conditions, the authors examine questions such as: Do contractionary and expansionary monetary policy shocks have symmetric effects? Do financial stress conditions play a role as a nonlinear propagator of monetary policy shocks? Does monetary policy have the same effect on the real economy in the low financial stress regime and in the high financial stress regime? Suppose that the economy is currently in a given financial stress regime, do monetary policy shocks have a substantial effect on the transition probability of moving from the given regime to the other? The empirical findings reveal that (i) contractionary monetary shocks typically have a larger effect on output than expansionary monetary shocks; (ii) the effects of large and small shocks are approximately proportional; (iii) expansionary monetary shocks have larger effects on output in the high financial stress regime than in the low financial stress regime; (iv) large expansionary monetary shocks increase the likelihood of moving to, or remaining in, the low financial stress regime; (v) typically, high financial stress regime has been characterized by weaker output growth, higher inflation, and higher interest rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Fuchun Li & Pierre St-Amant, 2010. "Financial Stress, Monetary Policy, and Economic Activity," Staff Working Papers 10-12, Bank of Canada.
  • Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:10-12
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/wp10-12.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rhee, Wooheon & Rich, Robert W., 1995. "Inflation and the asymmetric effects of money on output fluctuations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 683-702.
    2. Weise, Charles L, 1999. "The Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy: A Nonlinear Vector Autoregression Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(1), pages 85-108, February.
    3. Thoma, Mark A., 1994. "Subsample instability and asymmetries in money-income causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1-2), pages 279-306.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kilinc, Mustafa & Tunc, Cengiz, 2019. "The asymmetric effects of monetary policy on economic activity in Turkey," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 505-528.
    2. Renée Fry-Mckibbin & Jasmine Zheng, 2016. "Effects of the US monetary policy shocks during financial crises – a threshold vector autoregression approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(59), pages 5802-5823, December.
    3. Martin, Christopher & Milas, Costas, 2013. "Financial crises and monetary policy: Evidence from the UK," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 654-661.
    4. António Afonso & Jaromír Baxa & Michal Slavík, 2018. "Fiscal developments and financial stress: a threshold VAR analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 54(2), pages 395-423, March.
    5. Kremer, Manfred & Lo Duca, Marco & Holló, Dániel, 2012. "CISS - a composite indicator of systemic stress in the financial system," Working Paper Series 1426, European Central Bank.
    6. Rozina Shaheen, 2020. "Credit market conditions and impact of monetary policy in a developing economy context," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 409-425, May.
    7. Marius Constantin APOSTOAIE, 2011. "Inflation Targeting In Romania in the Perspective of Joining the Exchange Rate Mechanism II," Timisoara Journal of Economics, West University of Timisoara, Romania, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, vol. 4(1(13)), pages 43-56.
    8. Brana, Sophie & Campmas, Alexandra & Lapteacru, Ion, 2019. "(Un)Conventional monetary policy and bank risk-taking: A nonlinear relationship," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 576-593.
    9. Thibaut Duprey, 2020. "Canadian Financial Stress and Macroeconomic Conditions," Discussion Papers 2020-4, Bank of Canada.
    10. Aleksandra Zdzienicka & Sally Chen & Federico Diaz Kalan & Stefan Laseen & Katsiaryna Svirydzenka, 2015. "Effects of Monetary and Macroprudential Policies on Financial Conditions; Evidence from the United States," IMF Working Papers 15/288, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Fedorova, E. & Mukhin, A. & Dovzhenko, S., 2016. "Modeling Rules of Monetary Policy of the Central Bank of the Russian Federation with the Financial Stress Index," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 84-105.
    12. Ján Malega & Roman Horváth, 2017. "Financial Stress in the Czech Republic: Measurement and Effects on the Real Economy," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2017(3), pages 257-268.
    13. Apostolakis, George & Papadopoulos, Athanasios P., 2015. "Financial stress spillovers across the banking, securities and foreign exchange markets," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 1-21.
    14. Galyna Grynkiv & Lars Stentoft, 2018. "Stationary Threshold Vector Autoregressive Models," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-1, August.
    15. Halvorsen, Jørn I. & Jacobsen, Dag Henning, 2016. "The bank-lending channel empirically revisited," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 95-105.
    16. Tng & Kwek, 2015. "Financial stress, economic activity and monetary policy in the ASEAN-5 economies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(48), pages 5169-5185, October.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Khundrakpam, Jeevan Kumar, 2013. "A Note on Differential Asymmetric Effects of Money Supply and Policy Rate Shocks in India," MPRA Paper 53058, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Khundrakpam, Jeevan Kumar, 2013. "Are there Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy in India?," MPRA Paper 53059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Zakir, Nadia & Malik, Wasim Shahid, 2013. "Are the effects of monetary policy on output asymmetric in Pakistan?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 1-9.
    4. Silvana Tenreyro & Gregory Thwaites, 2016. "Pushing on a String: US Monetary Policy Is Less Powerful in Recessions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 43-74, October.
    5. Jan Jacobs & Jan Kakes, 2000. "Credit demand asymmetry in the Netherlands 1983-1997," MEB Series (discontinued) 2000-11, Netherlands Central Bank, Monetary and Economic Policy Department.
    6. Ahrens, Steffen & Pirschel, Inske & Snower, Dennis J., 2017. "A theory of price adjustment under loss aversion," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 78-95.
    7. Sajjad Zaheer & Steven Ongena & Sweder J.G. van Wijnbergen, 2013. "The Transmission of Monetary Policy Through Conventional and Islamic Banks," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 9(4), pages 175-224, December.
    8. Marianne Sensier & Denise R. Osborn & Nadir Öcal, 2002. "Asymmetric Interest Rate Effects for the UK Real Economy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(4), pages 315-339, September.
    9. Jackson, Laura E. & Owyang, Michael T. & Soques, Daniel, 2018. "Nonlinearities, smoothing and countercyclical monetary policy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 136-154.
    10. Tuysuz, Sukriye, 2007. "The asymmetric impact of macroeconomic announcements on U.S. Government bond rate level and volatility," MPRA Paper 5381, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Steven Ongena & Ibolya Schindele & Dzsamila Vonnák, 2017. "In Lands of Foreign Currency Credit, Bank Lending Channels Run Through?," MNB Working Papers 2017/6, Magyar Nemzeti Bank (Central Bank of Hungary).
    12. Edoardo GAFFEO & Ivan PETRELLA & Damjan PFAJFAR & Emiliano SANTORO, 2010. "Reference-dependent preferences and the transmission of monetary policy," Working Papers of Department of Economics, Leuven ces10.28, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), Department of Economics, Leuven.
    13. Philip Rothman & Dick van Dijk & Philip Hans Franses, 1999. "A Multivariate STAR Analysis of the Relationship Between Money and Output," Working Papers 9913, East Carolina University, Department of Economics.
    14. Vinícius dos Santos Cerqueira & Márcio Bruno Ribeiro & Thiago Sevilhano Martinez, 2011. "Propagação Assimétrica de Choques Monetários na Economia Brasileira: Evidências com Base em um Modelo Vetorial não Linear de Transição Suave," Discussion Papers 1639, Instituto de Pesquisa Econômica Aplicada - IPEA.
    15. Wang, Xia & Zheng, Tingguo & Zhu, Yanli, 2014. "Money–output Granger causal dynamics in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 192-200.
    16. Lo, Ming Chien & Piger, Jeremy, 2005. "Is the Response of Output to Monetary Policy Asymmetric? Evidence from a Regime-Switching Coefficients Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 37(5), pages 865-886, October.
    17. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José-Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2017. "“In the Short Run Blasé, In the Long Run Risqué”," Schmalenbach Business Review, Springer;Schmalenbach-Gesellschaft, vol. 18(3), pages 181-226, August.
    18. Apostolos Serletis & Khandokar Istiak, 2016. "Are the Responses of the U.S. Economy Asymmetric to Positive and Negative Money Supply Shocks?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 303-316, April.
    19. Altavilla, Carlo & Brugnolini, Luca & Gürkaynak, Refet S. & Motto, Roberto & Ragusa, Giuseppe, 2019. "Measuring euro area monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 162-179.
    20. Jiménez, Gabriel & Ongena, Steven & Peydró, José-Luis & Saurina, Jesús, 2017. "‘In the Short Run Blasé, in the Long Run Risqué’. On the Effects of Monetary Policy on Bank Credit Risk-Taking in the Short versus Long Run," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 181-226.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial stability; Monetary policy and uncertainty;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:10-12. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bocgvca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.