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Risk Sharing and Growth in Small-Open Economies

In this paper, we revisit the question of how domestic and foreign risks affect growth through the lens of an AK small-open economy model with risky borrowing/lending and global diversification. Wealth is allocated between domestic and foreign assets and the optimal allocation depends on both the difference in deterministic returns and the relative magnitude and correlation of domestic and foreign risks. Depending on parameters, the small-open economy may choose to either borrow from abroad, despite the fact that this is risky, or lend. In contrast to standard N-country models, whether growth is faster or slower (and whether growth is more or less volatile) compared to autarky is not entirely driven by relative risk aversion but also depends on the return and risk characteristics of domestic and foreign assets. We also show that growth volatility and mean growth have typically nonmonotonic relationships with the the levels and correlation of domestic and foreign risks. We argue that these results are in line with, and lay down some theoretical foundations for explaining the conflicting empirical results regarding the impact of international financial integration on growth and in particular threshold effects.

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Paper provided by Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France in its series AMSE Working Papers with number 1537.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: 17 Sep 2015
Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1537
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/en

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  11. Raouf Boucekkine & Patrick Pintus & Benteng Zou, 2015. "Stochastic stability of endogenous growth:Theory and applications," CREA Discussion Paper Series 15-09, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
  12. van Wincoop, Eric, 1999. "How big are potential welfare gains from international risksharing?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 109-135, February.
  13. Paul A. Samuelson, 2011. "Lifetime Portfolio Selection by Dynamic Stochastic Programming," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: THE KELLY CAPITAL GROWTH INVESTMENT CRITERION THEORY and PRACTICE, chapter 31, pages 465-472 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
  14. M. Ayhan Kose & Eswar S. Prasad & Marco E. Terrones, 2005. "Growth and Volatility in an Era of Globalization," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(si), pages 31-63.
  15. Steger, Thomas M., 2005. "Stochastic growth under Wiener and Poisson uncertainty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 86(3), pages 311-316, March.
  16. Merton, Robert C, 1969. "Lifetime Portfolio Selection under Uncertainty: The Continuous-Time Case," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(3), pages 247-257, August.
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