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Gender Differences in Agricultural Productivity: The Role of Market Imperfections

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  • Palacios-López, Amparo
  • López, Ramon E.

Abstract

This paper shows the implications of credit and labor market imperfections on gender differences in agricultural labor productivity, especially highlighting how both imperfections negatively affect female productivity by discouraging off-farm income generating activities and restricting access to inputs. The paper theoretically models the relationship between gender differences in agricultural labor productivity and market imperfections and it provides empirical evidence consistent with our theoretical model by decomposing the contribution of different factors to such gender differences. We find that agricultural labor productivity is on average 44 percent lower on plots belonging to female-headed households than on those belonging to male-headed households.

Suggested Citation

  • Palacios-López, Amparo & López, Ramon E., 2014. "Gender Differences in Agricultural Productivity: The Role of Market Imperfections," Working Papers 164061, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:umdrwp:164061
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Kilic, Talip & Palacios-López, Amparo & Goldstein, Markus, 2015. "Caught in a Productivity Trap: A Distributional Perspective on Gender Differences in Malawian Agriculture," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 416-463.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koirala, Krishna H. & Mishra, Ashok K. & Sitienei, Isaac, 2015. "Farm Productivity and Technical Efficiency of Rural Malawian Households: Does Gender Make a Difference?," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196903, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Palacios-Lopez, Amparo & Christiaensen, Luc & Kilic, Talip, 2017. "How much of the labor in African agriculture is provided by women?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 52-63.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:216-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Koirala, Krishna H. & Mishra, Ashok K. & Mohanty, Samarendu, 2014. "The Role of Gender in Agricultural Productivity in the Philippines: The Average Treatment Effect," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 195705, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Avila-Santamaria, Jorge & Useche, Pilar, 2016. "Women’s Participation in Agriculture and Gender Productivity Gap: The Case of Coffee Farmers in Southern Colombia and Northern Ecuador," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236156, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Agriculture; Productivity; Decomposition Methods; Sub-Saharan Africa; Malawi; International Development; Labor and Human Capital; Productivity Analysis; C21; J16; Q12;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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