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Providing Agri-environmental Public Goods through Collective Action: Lessons from New Zealand Case Studies


  • Uetake, Tetsuya


Agriculture is a provider of food and, to a certain extent, public goods such as biodiversity and landscape, but it can also have negative impacts on natural assets such as biodiversity and water quality. In addition to implementing policies that target individual farmers, different approaches are needed to promote collective action. The literature review and three New Zealand case studies (Sustainable Farming Fund, East Coast Forestry Project and North Otago Irrigation Company) have identified some findings including benefits and barriers of collective action and key factors for its success. Collective action should be given serious consideration in addressing agri-environmental problems.

Suggested Citation

  • Uetake, Tetsuya, 2012. "Providing Agri-environmental Public Goods through Collective Action: Lessons from New Zealand Case Studies," 2012 Conference, August 31, 2012, Nelson, New Zealand 136071, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:nzar12:136071

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David Blandford, 2010. "Presidential Address: The Visible or Invisible Hand? The Balance Between Markets and Regulation in Agricultural Policy," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 459-479.
    2. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    3. Elinor Ostrom, 2010. "Analyzing collective action," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(s1), pages 155-166, November.
    4. Rudd, Murray A., 2000. "Live long and prosper: collective action, social capital and social vision," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 131-144, July.
    5. Vaclav Vojtech, 2010. "Policy Measures Addressing Agri-environmental Issues," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 24, OECD Publishing.
    6. Kennedy, Loraine, 1999. "Cooperating for Survival: Tannery Pollution and Joint Action in the Palar Valley (India)," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1673-1691, September.
    7. Ayer, Harry W., 1997. "Grass Roots Collective Action: Agricultural Opportunities," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(01), July.
    8. Hodge, Ian & McNally, Sandra, 2000. "Wetland restoration, collective action and the role of water management institutions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 107-118, October.
    9. McCarthy, Nancy, 2004. "Local-level public goods and collective action," 2020 vision briefs 11 No. 4, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    More about this item


    Collective action; public goods; agri-environmental policy; social capital; Agribusiness; Environmental Economics and Policy; Public Economics;

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