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Bt Cotton Adoption and Wellbeing of Farmers in Pakistan

Author

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  • Nazli, Hina
  • Orden, David
  • Sarker, Rakhal
  • Meilke, Karl D.

Abstract

Among the four largest cotton-producing countries, only Pakistan had not commercially adopted Bt cotton by 2010. However, the cultivation of first-generation (Cry1Ac) Bt cotton, unapproved and unregulated, increased rapidly after 2005. Using the propensity score matching method, this paper examines the economic impact of the available Bt varieties on farmers’ wellbeing. The analysis is based on data collected through structured questionnaires in January-February 2009 from 206 growers in 16 villages in two cotton-growing districts, Bahawalpur and Mirpur Khas. The results indicate a positive impact of Bt cotton on the wellbeing of farmers in Pakistan. However, the extent of impact varies by agro-climatic conditions and size of farm. Bt cotton appeared most effective in the hot and humid areas where pest pressure from bollworms is high. The per-acre yield gains for medium and large farmers are higher than for small farmers. This suggests that additional public-sector interventions may be complementary to introduction of Bt cotton to make this technology widely beneficial in Pakistan.

Suggested Citation

  • Nazli, Hina & Orden, David & Sarker, Rakhal & Meilke, Karl D., 2012. "Bt Cotton Adoption and Wellbeing of Farmers in Pakistan," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126172, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126172
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    Cited by:

    1. Rana, Muhammad & Spielman, David J. & Zaidi, Fatima, 2015. "The Architecture of the Pakistani Seed System: A Case of Market-Regulation Dissonance," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211560, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Xingliang Ma & Melinda Smale & David J. Spielman & Patricia Zambrano & Hina Nazli & Fatima Zaidi, 2017. "A Question of Integrity: Variants of Bt Cotton, Pesticides and Productivity in Pakistan," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(2), pages 366-385, June.
    3. Nazli, Hina & Orden, David & Sarker, Rakhal & Meilke, Karl D., 2012. "Bt Cotton Adoption and Wellbeing of Farmers in Pakistan," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126172, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Ma, Xingliang & Spielman, David J. & Nazli, Hina & Zambrano, Patricia & Zaidi, Fatima & Kouser, Shahzad, 2014. "The role of social networks in an imperfect market for agricultural technology products: Evidence on Bt cotton adoption in Pakistan," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 175276, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Kouser, Shahzad & Qaim, Matin & Abedullah, 2015. "Bt cotton and employment effects for female agricultural laborers in Pakistan: An application of double-hurdle model," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212014, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Ma, Xingliang & Smale, Melinda & Spielman, David J. & Zambrano, Patricia & Nazli, Hina & Zaidi, Fatima, 2016. "Varietal integrity, damage abatement, and productivity: Evidence from the cultivation of Bt cotton in Pakistan:," IFPRI discussion papers 1520, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bt cotton; Pakistan; propensity score matching; selection bias; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; O3;

    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights

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