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Are models and respondents talking the same language: evidence from stated and inferred discontinuous preferences in a choice experiment valuing public goods?

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  • Espinosa, Maria
  • Rodriguez, Macario
  • Madureira, Livia Maria Costa
  • Santos, Jose Lima
  • Gomez y Paloma, Sergio

Abstract

In the choice experiment framework, it is assumed that respondents consider all the attributes when making their choices. However, there is evidence that respondents may not consider all the attributes. This study has proved that in our Choice Experiment survey evaluating public goods, there is significant correlation between the stated preferences declared in a continuous scale by the respondents and the parameter estimates inferred from the models. The correlation has been tested for the coefficient of variation estimated in a Random Parameter Logit and the probability of ignoring derived from a 2K latent class model.

Suggested Citation

  • Espinosa, Maria & Rodriguez, Macario & Madureira, Livia Maria Costa & Santos, Jose Lima & Gomez y Paloma, Sergio, 2014. "Are models and respondents talking the same language: evidence from stated and inferred discontinuous preferences in a choice experiment valuing public goods?," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182668, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae14:182668
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.182668
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    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/182668/files/Espinosa_Goded-Are_models_and_respondents_talking_the_same_language-465_a.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wang, Xuehong & Bennett, Jeff & Xie, Chen & Zhang, Zhitao & Liang, Dan, 2007. "Estimating non-market environmental benefits of the Conversion of Cropland to Forest and Grassland Program: A choice modeling approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 114-125, June.
    2. Sergio Colombo & Nick Hanley, 2008. "How Can We Reduce the Errors from Benefits Transfer? An Investigation Using the Choice Experiment Method," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(1), pages 128-147.
    3. Hensher, David A. & Rose, John & Bertoia, Tony, 2007. "The implications on willingness to pay of a stochastic treatment of attribute processing in stated choice studies," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 73-89, March.
    4. Stephane Hess & Amanda Stathopoulos & Danny Campbell & Vikki O’Neill & Sebastian Caussade, 2013. "It’s not that I don’t care, I just don’t care very much: confounding between attribute non-attendance and taste heterogeneity," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 583-607, May.
    5. Danny Campbell & W. Hutchinson & Riccardo Scarpa, 2008. "Incorporating Discontinuous Preferences into the Analysis of Discrete Choice Experiments," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(3), pages 401-417, November.
    6. Fredrik Carlsson & Mitesh Kataria & Elina Lampi, 2010. "Dealing with Ignored Attributes in Choice Experiments on Valuation of Sweden’s Environmental Quality Objectives," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 47(1), pages 65-89, September.
    7. Riccardo Scarpa & Timothy J. Gilbride & Danny Campbell & David A. Hensher, 2009. "Modelling attribute non-attendance in choice experiments for rural landscape valuation," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 151-174, June.
    8. David Hensher & John Rose & William Greene, 2005. "The implications on willingness to pay of respondents ignoring specific attributes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 203-222, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Berki-Kiss & Klaus Menrad, 2019. "Consumer Preferences of Sustainability Labeled Cut Roses in Germany," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(12), pages 1-1, June.

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