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Heterogenous Impact of ‘Rice for the Poor’ Program in Indonesia

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  • Pangaribowo, Evita Hanie

Abstract

This study evaluates the impact of the ‘Rice for the Poor’ program – an almost universal program of Indonesian Social Safety Net Program in the time of economic crisis. The program aimed to protect poor households from the negative effects of economic crisis through providing highly subsidized rice price. To assess the impact of the ‘Rice for the Poor’ program, this study utilizes matching estimator approach combined with difference in difference method. The rich longitudinal dataset used in this study enables matching estimator and difference in difference approach to provide accurate estimate of the program’s impact on its beneficiaries. Heterogeneous impact of the program shows that the program has a limited impact on the neediest group. It is found that the ‘Rice for the Poor’ program has a limited impact on the bottom income households. The program has only enabled the poorest households to increase their meat and dairy products expenditures though the treatment effect is very large. The ‘Rice for the Poor’ program has also led to an unintended impact where non targeted households have gained more from the program. The findings suggest that applying conditionality might reduce the errors of inclusion and give more desirable effects for the poor.

Suggested Citation

  • Pangaribowo, Evita Hanie, 2012. "Heterogenous Impact of ‘Rice for the Poor’ Program in Indonesia," 86th Annual Conference, April 16-18, 2012, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 134755, Agricultural Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aesc12:134755
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/134755
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
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    3. Block, Steven A. & Kiess, Lynnda & Webb, Patrick & Kosen, Soewarta & Moench-Pfanner, Regina & Bloem, Martin W. & Peter Timmer, C., 2004. "Macro shocks and micro outcomes: child nutrition during Indonesia's crisis," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 21-44, March.
    4. Daniel O. Gilligan & John Hoddinott, 2007. "Is There Persistence in the Impact of Emergency Food Aid? Evidence on Consumption, Food Security, and Assets in Rural Ethiopia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 225-242.
    5. Abebaw, Degnet & Fentie, Yibeltal & Kassa, Belay, 2010. "The impact of a food security program on household food consumption in Northwestern Ethiopia: A matching estimator approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 286-293, August.
    6. Giles, John & Satriawan, Elan, 2015. "Protecting child nutritional status in the aftermath of a financial crisis: Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 97-106.
    7. Johar, Meliyanni, 2009. "The impact of the Indonesian health card program: A matching estimator approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 35-53, January.
    8. Alberto Abadie & Guido W. Imbens, 2008. "On the Failure of the Bootstrap for Matching Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1537-1557, November.
    9. Daniel O. Gilligan & John Hoddinott, 2007. "Is There Persistence in the Impact of Emergency Food Aid? Evidence on Consumption, Food Security, and Assets in Rural Ethiopia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 225-242.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Impact evaluation; ‘Rice for the Poor’; nutrient-rich food; Food Security and Poverty; I38;

    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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