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The Trade Restrictiveness Index: The Potential Contribution To Agricultural Policy Analysis

  • Salvatici, Luca
  • Carter, Colin A.
  • Sumner, Daniel A.

In the policy arena, there is a demand for "trade distortion indicators", but many of the traditional indices are difficult to compute and interpret. Recent developments in the literature have led to a new indicator: the Trade Restrictiveness Index (TRI). This paper analyzes some problems related to the TRI's computation and interpretation. We argue that the index is theoretically well grounded and offers potential for measuring the relative importance of agricultural policy distortions. However, the name of "trade restrictiveness" index is seriously misleading, since the TRI does not provide a measure of trade flows restrictions.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21028
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Paper provided by American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) in its series 1997 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Toronto, Canada with number 21028.

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Date of creation: 1997
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Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea97:21028
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  1. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1994. "Measuring the Restrictiveness of Trade Policy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 151-69, May.
  2. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1993. "Domestic Distortions and International Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 786, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1996. "A New Approach to Evaluating Trade Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 107-25, January.
  4. De Benedictis, Michele & De Filippis, Fabrizio & Salvatici, Luca, 1991. "Between Scylla and Charibdys: Agricultural Economists' Navigation around Protectionism and Free Trade," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 18(3-4), pages 311-37.
  5. Hatta, Tatsuo, 1977. "A Theory of Piecemeal Policy Recommendations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 1-21, February.
  6. Foster, Edward & Sonnenschein, Hugo, 1970. "Price Distortion and Economic Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(2), pages 281-97, March.
  7. James E. Anderson, 1993. "Tariff Index Theory," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 215, Boston College Department of Economics.
  8. Neary, J Peter, 1989. "Trade Liberalization and Shadow Prices in the Presence of Tariffs and Quotas," CEPR Discussion Papers 345, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1992. "Trade Reform with Quotas, Partial Rent Retention, and Tariffs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(1), pages 57-76, January.
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