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The Trade Restrictiveness Index: The Potential Contribution To Agricultural Policy Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Salvatici, Luca
  • Carter, Colin A.
  • Sumner, Daniel A.

Abstract

In the policy arena, there is a demand for "trade distortion indicators", but many of the traditional indices are difficult to compute and interpret. Recent developments in the literature have led to a new indicator: the Trade Restrictiveness Index (TRI). This paper analyzes some problems related to the TRI's computation and interpretation. We argue that the index is theoretically well grounded and offers potential for measuring the relative importance of agricultural policy distortions. However, the name of "trade restrictiveness" index is seriously misleading, since the TRI does not provide a measure of trade flows restrictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Salvatici, Luca & Carter, Colin A. & Sumner, Daniel A., 1997. "The Trade Restrictiveness Index: The Potential Contribution To Agricultural Policy Analysis," 1997 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Toronto, Canada 21028, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea97:21028
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/21028/files/spsalv01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James E. Anderson & J. Peter Neary, 1996. "A New Approach to Evaluating Trade Policy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 63(1), pages 107-125.
    2. Neary, J Peter, 1995. "Trade Liberalisation and Shadow Prices in the Presence of Tariffs and Quotas," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(3), pages 531-554, August.
    3. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1994. "Measuring the Restrictiveness of Trade Policy," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 151-169, May.
    4. De Benedictis, Michele & De Filippis, Fabrizio & Salvatici, Luca, 1991. "Between Scylla and Charibdys: Agricultural Economists' Navigation around Protectionism and Free Trade," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 18(3-4), pages 311-337.
    5. Anderson, James E & Bannister, Geoffrey J & Neary, J Peter, 1995. "Domestic Distortions and International Trade," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(1), pages 139-157, February.
    6. Anderson, James E & Neary, J Peter, 1992. "Trade Reform with Quotas, Partial Rent Retention, and Tariffs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(1), pages 57-76, January.
    7. Tatsuo Hatta, 1977. "A Theory of Piecemeal Policy Recommendations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 1-21.
    8. Anderson, James E, 1995. "Tariff-Index Theory," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(2), pages 156-173, June.
    9. Foster, Edward & Sonnenschein, Hugo, 1970. "Price Distortion and Economic Welfare," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 38(2), pages 281-297, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John C. Beghin & Jean-Christophe Bureau & Sung Joon Park, 2003. "Food Security and Agricultural Protection in South Korea," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(3), pages 618-632.
    2. Luca Salvatici, 1997. "Recent developments in the measurement of the effects of trade policy: index number method and trade restrictiveness index," Working Papers 27, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    3. Beghin, John C. & Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Park, Sung Joon, 2002. "The Cost of Food Self-Sufficiency and Agricultural Protection in South Korea," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24879, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Maria Cipollina & Luca Salvatici, 2008. "Measuring Protection: Mission Impossible?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(3), pages 577-616, July.
    5. Luca Salvatici, 2001. "Trade Distortion Indexes and Applied General Equilibrium Models: The Case of the Common Agricoltural Policy," Working Papers 45, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.

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