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Explaining Price Transmission Asymmetry In The Us Peanut Marketing Chain

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  • Revoredo-Giha, Cesar
  • Nadolnyak, Denis A.
  • Fletcher, Stanley M.

Abstract

n the paper, we study price transmission from wholesale peanut prices to retail peanut butter prices. Using monthly data since 1984, we show that, while an increase in peanut prices is almost immediately transferred to peanut butter prices, it takes several months for a price decrease to be reflected in the peanut butter prices. Besides, the long term price transmission effect also appears to be symmetric. The observed short and long-term asymmetry is explained as a result of profit maximizing inventory management and/or some degree of market power in peanut processing.

Suggested Citation

  • Revoredo-Giha, Cesar & Nadolnyak, Denis A. & Fletcher, Stanley M., 2004. "Explaining Price Transmission Asymmetry In The Us Peanut Marketing Chain," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20363, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20363
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20363
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Enders, Walter & Granger, Clive W J, 1998. "Unit-Root Tests and Asymmetric Adjustment with an Example Using the Term Structure of Interest Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(3), pages 304-311, July.
    5. Jochen Meyer & Stephan Cramon-Taubadel, 2004. "Asymmetric Price Transmission: A Survey," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 581-611.
    6. Dobson, Paul W & Waterson, Michael, 1997. "Countervailing Power and Consumer Prices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 418-430, March.
    7. Anderson, Simon P. & de Palma, Andre & Kreider, Brent, 2001. "Tax incidence in differentiated product oligopoly," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 173-192, August.
    8. Severin Borenstein & A. Colin Cameron & Richard Gilbert, 1997. "Do Gasoline Prices Respond Asymmetrically to Crude Oil Price Changes?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 305-339.
    9. Kai-Uwe Kuhn, 1997. "Nonlinear Pricing in Vertically Related Duopolies," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(1), pages 37-62, Spring.
    10. Louis Phlips, 1980. "Intertemporal Price Discrimination and Sticky Prices," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 94(3), pages 525-542.
    11. Steve McCorriston & Ian M. Sheldon, 1997. "Vertical restraints and competition policy in the US and UK food marketing systems," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 237-252.
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