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Admissible statistics of educational achievement scores

In: Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 5

  • Kristian Koerselman

    ()

    (Swedish Institute for Social Research)

Labor economists regularly regress educational achievement scores on covariates to examine what a ects achievement. I discuss the mea surement and interpretation of achievement scores, and argue that, as the scores are typically measured on an ordinal scale, their analysis in terms of higher level statistics such as means is inappropriate, and that we should use quantile-based analysis instead. I investigate how large possible bias from mean-based methods is by comparing test score distributions to the distribution of monetary value of the same scores. In most cases, the bias will be quantitatively small, and conclusions qualitatively robust.

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This chapter was published in:
  • María Jesús Mancebón-Torrubia & Domingo P. Ximénez-de-Embún & José María Gómez-Sancho & Gregorio Gim (ed.), 2010. "Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación," E-books Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, edition 1, volume 5, number 05, 5.
  • This item is provided by Asociación de Economía de la Educación in its series Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 5 with number 05-40.
    Handle: RePEc:aec:ieed05:05-40
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.economicsofeducation.com

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    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Wößmann, 2005. "Does Education Tracking Affect Performance and Inequality? Differences-In-Differences Evidence Across Countries," Discussion Papers 04-027, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    2. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2011. "Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1739-74, August.
    3. Pekkarinen, Tuomas & Uusitalo, Roope & Kerr, Sari Pekkala, 2009. "School Tracking and Development of Cognitive Skills," IZA Discussion Papers 4058, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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