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Damian Tobin

Personal Details

First Name:Damian
Middle Name:
Last Name:Tobin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pto221

Affiliation

Department of Financial and Management Studies (DeFiMS)
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.defims.ac.uk/

: +44 (0)20 7898 4487
+44 (0)20 7898 4829

RePEc:edi:dfsoauk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Damian Tobin, 2013. "Renminbi internationalisation: precedents and implications," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 81-99, May.
  2. Damian Tobin, 2013. "The renminbi as an international currency: the next instalment of China’s economic reforms," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 73-79, May.
  3. Damian Tobin, 2012. "The Anglo-Saxon paradox: corporate governance best-practices and the reform deficit in China's banking sector," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(2), pages 147-168, February.
  4. Tobin, Damian, 2011. "Austerity and Moral Compromise: Lessons from the Development of China's Banking System," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 700-711, May.
  5. Tobin, Damian & Sun, Laixiang, 2009. "International Listing as a Means to Mobilize the Benefits of Financial Globalization: Micro-level Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 825-838, April.
  6. Damian Tobin, 2008. "From Maoist self-reliance to international oil consumer: a resource-based appraisal of the challenges facing China's petrochemical sector," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 363-383.
  7. Damian Tobin & Shikha Singh, 2008. "International best practices, domestic constraints and international listing: evidence from China's state banking sector," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 341-361.
  8. Laixiang Sun & Damian Tobin, 2008. "Special issue on China's adaptation to global best business practices: introduction," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 335-340.
  9. Laixiang Sun & Damian Tobin, 2005. "International Listing as a Mechanism of Commitment to More Credible Corporate Governance Practices: the case of the Bank of China (Hong Kong)," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 81-91, January.
  10. Tobin, Damian, 2005. "Economic Liberalization, the Changing Role of the State and "Wagner's Law": China's Development Experience since 1978," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 729-743, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Damian Tobin, 2013. "Renminbi internationalisation: precedents and implications," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 81-99, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Batten, Jonathan A. & Szilagyi, Peter G., 2016. "The internationalisation of the RMB: New starts, jumps and tipping points," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 221-238.

  2. Tobin, Damian & Sun, Laixiang, 2009. "International Listing as a Means to Mobilize the Benefits of Financial Globalization: Micro-level Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 825-838, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Shu-Yun Ma, 2010. "Shareholding System Reform in China," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13243.
    2. Wilson, Ross, 2016. "Does Governance Cause Growth? Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 138-151.
    3. Linda Yueh, 2010. "The Economy of China," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3705.
    4. Wilson, Ross, 2015. "Does Governance Cause Growth? Evidence from China," Working Papers 2015:14, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    5. Tobin, Damian, 2011. "Austerity and Moral Compromise: Lessons from the Development of China's Banking System," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 700-711, May.
    6. Yao, Yang & Yueh, Linda, 2009. "Law, Finance, and Economic Growth in China: An Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 753-762, April.

  3. Laixiang Sun & Damian Tobin, 2005. "International Listing as a Mechanism of Commitment to More Credible Corporate Governance Practices: the case of the Bank of China (Hong Kong)," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(1), pages 81-91, January.

    Cited by:

    1. James R. Barth & Gerard Caprio Jr., 2007. "China's Changing Financial System: Can It Catch Up With, or Even Drive Growth," NFI Policy Briefs 2007-PB-05, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.
    2. Teng Lin & Marion Hutchinson & Majella Percy, 2015. "Earnings management and the role of the audit committee: an investigation of the influence of cross-listing and government officials on the audit committee," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 19(1), pages 197-227, February.
    3. Gagalyuk, Taras, 2017. "Strategic role of corporate transparency: the case of Ukrainian agroholdings," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 257-278.
    4. Tobin, Damian & Sun, Laixiang, 2009. "International Listing as a Means to Mobilize the Benefits of Financial Globalization: Micro-level Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 825-838, April.

  4. Tobin, Damian, 2005. "Economic Liberalization, the Changing Role of the State and "Wagner's Law": China's Development Experience since 1978," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 729-743, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2006. "Panel Data, Cointegration, Causality And Wagner'S Law: Empirical Evidence From Chinese Provinces," Monash Economics Working Papers 01/06, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Philip Gunby & Yinghua Jin, 2016. "Determinants of Chinese Government Size: An Extreme Bounds Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 16/25, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    3. Alfred Wu & Mi Lin, 2012. "Determinants of government size: evidence from China," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(1), pages 255-270, April.
    4. Narayan, Seema & Rath, Badri Narayan & Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2012. "Evidence of Wagner's law from Indian states," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 1548-1557.
    5. Xiao Tan, 2017. "Explaining provincial government health expenditures in China: evidence from panel data 2007–2013," China Finance and Economic Review, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, December.
    6. Kucukkale, Yakup & Yamak, Rahmi, 2012. "Cointegration, causality and Wagner’s law with disaggregated data: evidence from Turkey, 1968-2004," MPRA Paper 36894, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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