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Marie Rekkas

Personal Details

First Name:Marie
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rekkas
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pre255
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.sfu.ca/~mrekkas

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Simon Fraser University

Burnaby, Canada
http://www.sfu.ca/economics/

: (778) 782-3508
(778) 782-5944
Burnaby, B.C., V5A 1S6
RePEc:edi:desfuca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Rekkas, M., 2009. "Approximate inference for the multinomial logit model," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 237-242, January.
  2. Rekkas, M. & Wong, A., 2008. "Implementing likelihood-based inference for fat-tailed distributions," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 32-46, March.
  3. M. Rekkas & Y. Sun & A. Wong, 2008. "Improved inference for first-order autocorrelation using likelihood analysis," Journal of Time Series Analysis, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 513-532, May.
  4. Kevin Milligan & Marie Rekkas, 2008. "Campaign spending limits, incumbent spending, and election outcomes," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1351-1374, November.
  5. Marie Rekkas, 2007. "The Impact of Campaign Spending on Votes in Multiparty Elections," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 573-585, August.
  6. Fraser, D.A.S. & Rekkas, M. & Wong, A., 2005. "Highly accurate likelihood analysis for the seemingly unrelated regression problem," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 127(1), pages 17-33, July.
  7. Rekkas, M. & Wong, A., 2005. "Third-order inference for the Weibull distribution," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 499-525, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Rekkas, M. & Wong, A., 2008. "Implementing likelihood-based inference for fat-tailed distributions," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 32-46, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Preminger, Arie & Storti, Giuseppe, 2014. "Least squares estimation for GARCH (1,1) model with heavy tailed errors," MPRA Paper 59082, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  2. Kevin Milligan & Marie Rekkas, 2008. "Campaign spending limits, incumbent spending, and election outcomes," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1351-1374, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric Avis & Claudio Ferraz & Frederico Finan & Carlos Varjão, "undated". "Money and Politics: The Effects of Campaign Spending Limits on Political Competition and Incumbency Advantage," Textos para discussão 656, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    2. Bombardini, Matilde & Trebbi, Francesco, 2011. "Votes or money? Theory and evidence from the US Congress," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 587-611.
    3. William Pyle & Laura Solanko, 2013. "The composition and interests of Russia’s business lobbies: testing Olson’s hypothesis of the “encompassing organization”," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 155(1), pages 19-41, April.
    4. Pastine, Ivan & Pastine, Tuvana, 2012. "Incumbency advantage and political campaign spending limits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 20-32.
    5. Jan Brueckner & Kangoh Lee, 2015. "Negative campaigning in a probabilistic voting model," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 164(3), pages 379-399, September.
    6. Ivan Pastine & Tuvana Pastine, 2010. "Political Campaign Spending Limits," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n213-10.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    7. Martin Grossmann & Helmut Dietl, 2012. "Asymmetric contests with liquidity constraints," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(3), pages 691-713, March.
    8. Brandon Schaufele, 2013. "Dissent in Parliament as Reputation Building," Working Papers 1301E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    9. Abel François & Michael Visser & Lionel Wilner, 2016. "Using Political Financing Reforms to Measure Campaign Spending Effects on Electoral Outcomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 6232, CESifo Group Munich.

  3. Marie Rekkas, 2007. "The Impact of Campaign Spending on Votes in Multiparty Elections," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 573-585, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Gordon, Brett R. & Hartmann, Wesley R., 2011. "Advertising Effects in Presidential Elections," Research Papers 2080, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    2. Matias Iaryczower & Andrea Mattozzi, 2012. "The pro-competitive effect of campaign limits in non-majoritarian elections," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 49(3), pages 591-619, April.
    3. Bernardo S. Da Silveira & João M. P. De Mello, 2011. "Campaign Advertising and Election Outcomes: Quasi-natural Experiment Evidence from Gubernatorial Elections in Brazil," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(2), pages 590-612.
    4. Arianna Degan, 2013. "Civic duty and political advertising," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(2), pages 531-564, March.
    5. John Maloney & Andrew Pickering, 2013. "Political Competition, Political Donations, Economic Policy and Growth," Discussion Papers 13/21, Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Kräkel, Matthias & Nieken, Petra & Przemeck, Judith, 2014. "Risk taking and investing in electoral competition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 98-120.
    7. Abel François & Michael Visser & Lionel Wilner, 2016. "Using Political Financing Reforms to Measure Campaign Spending Effects on Electoral Outcomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 6232, CESifo Group Munich.

  4. Fraser, D.A.S. & Rekkas, M. & Wong, A., 2005. "Highly accurate likelihood analysis for the seemingly unrelated regression problem," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 127(1), pages 17-33, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Min & Sun, Xiaoqian, 2012. "Bayesian inference for the correlation coefficient in two seemingly unrelated regressions," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(8), pages 2442-2453.
    2. Zellner, Arnold & Ando, Tomohiro, 2010. "A direct Monte Carlo approach for Bayesian analysis of the seemingly unrelated regression model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 159(1), pages 33-45, November.
    3. Meuer, Johannes & Rupietta, Christian & Backes-Gellner, Uschi, 2015. "Layers of co-existing innovation systems," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 888-910.
    4. Zellner, Arnold & Ando, Tomohiro, 2010. "Bayesian and non-Bayesian analysis of the seemingly unrelated regression model with Student-t errors, and its application for forecasting," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 413-434, April.
    5. Zhao, Li & Xu, Xingzhong, 2017. "Generalized canonical correlation variables improved estimation in high dimensional seemingly unrelated regression models," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 119-126.

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