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Thomas Clay McManus

Personal Details

First Name:Thomas
Middle Name:Clay
Last Name:McManus
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmc273
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http://claymcmanus.com
Terminal Degree:2015 Department of Economics; College of Business; University of Tennessee-Knoxville (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Xavier University

Cincinnati, Ohio (United States)
http://www.xu.edu/economics/

513/745-3064

Williams College of Business, 3rd floor, 3800 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati, Ohio 45207-3212
RePEc:edi:dexavus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Matthew Lang & T. Clay McManus & Georg Schaur, 2019. "The effects of import competition on health in the local economy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 44-56, January.
  2. McManus, T. Clay & Schaur, Georg, 2016. "The effects of import competition on worker health," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 160-172.
  3. McManus, T. Clay & Rao, Justin M., 2015. "Signaling smarts? Revealed preferences for self and social perceptions of intelligence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 106-118.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Matthew Lang & T. Clay McManus & Georg Schaur, 2019. "The effects of import competition on health in the local economy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 44-56, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Giuntella, Osea & Rieger, Matthias & Rotunno, Lorenzo, 2019. "Weight Gains from Trade in Foods: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 12677, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Justin R. Pierce & Peter K. Schott, 2016. "Trade Liberalization and Mortality : Evidence from U.S. Counties," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-094, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Matthieu Crozet & Laura Hering & Sandra Poncet, 2018. "Looking for the Bright Side of the China Syndrome: Rising Export Opportunities and Life Satisfaction in China," Working Papers 2018-14, CEPII research center.
    4. Patralekha Ukil, 2019. "Parental Economic Shocks and Infant Health: The Effect of Import Competition in the U.S," Working papers 2019-18, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    5. Colantone, Italo & Crinò, Rosario & Ogliari, Laura, 2019. "Globalization and mental distress," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 181-207.
    6. Antonia Lopez Villavicencio & Maria Cervini, 2019. "The mental health consequences of globalisation," EconomiX Working Papers 2019-26, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    7. Yu-Chun Lin & Yu-Hung Chang & Huang-Ting Yan, 2020. "Is trade a blessing or a curse? A panel data analysis of the determinants of depressive disorders," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 65(7), pages 1113-1121, September.

  2. McManus, T. Clay & Schaur, Georg, 2016. "The effects of import competition on worker health," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 160-172.

    Cited by:

    1. Ulrich Schetter & Oriol Tejada, 2019. "On Globalization and the Concentration of Talent," CID Working Papers 121a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Giuntella, Osea & Rieger, Matthias & Rotunno, Lorenzo, 2019. "Weight Gains from Trade in Foods: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 12677, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Rania Gihleb & Osea Giuntella & Luca Stella & Tianyi Wang, 2020. "Industrial Robots, Workers’ Safety, and Health," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1107, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Jérôme Adda & Yarine Fawaz, 2020. "The Health Toll of Import Competition," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 130(630), pages 1501-1540.
    5. Justin R. Pierce & Peter K. Schott, 2016. "Trade Liberalization and Mortality : Evidence from U.S. Counties," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-094, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    6. Herzer, Dierk, 2014. "The long-run relationship between trade and population health: evidence from five decades," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100441, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Abeliansky, Ana Lucia & Beulmann, Matthias, 2019. "Are they coming for us? Industrial robots and the mental health of workers," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 379, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    8. Matthieu Crozet & Laura Hering & Sandra Poncet, 2018. "Looking for the Bright Side of the China Syndrome: Rising Export Opportunities and Life Satisfaction in China," Working Papers 2018-14, CEPII research center.
    9. Hummels, David & Munch, Jakob & Xiang, Chong, 2015. "No Pain, No Gain: The Effects of Exports on Job Injury and Sickness," 2015: Trade and Societal Well-Being, December 13-15, 2015, Clearwater Beach, Florida 229253, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    10. Rafael Dix-Carneiro & Rodrigo R. Soares & Gabriel Ulyssea, 2017. "Economic Shocks and Crime: Evidence from the Brazilian Trade Liberalization," NBER Working Papers 23400, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Dyballa, Katharina & Kraft, Kornelius, 2018. "Foreign competition and executive compensation in the manufacturing industry: A comparison between Germany and the U.S," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-034, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    12. Yan Du & Yi Lu, 2018. "The Great Opening up and the Roadmap for the Future: The Story of China's International Trade," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 26(2), pages 68-93, March.
    13. Patralekha Ukil, 2019. "Parental Economic Shocks and Infant Health: The Effect of Import Competition in the U.S," Working papers 2019-18, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    14. Gihleb, Rania & Giuntella, Osea & Stella, Luca & Wang, Tianyi, 2020. "Industrial Robots, Workers' Safety, and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 13672, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Colantone, Italo & Crinò, Rosario & Ogliari, Laura, 2019. "Globalization and mental distress," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 181-207.
    16. Antonia Lopez Villavicencio & Maria Cervini, 2019. "The mental health consequences of globalisation," EconomiX Working Papers 2019-26, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    17. Lu, Yi & Shao, Xiang & Tao, Zhigang, 2018. "Exposure to Chinese imports and media slant: Evidence from 147 U.S. local newspapers over 1998–2012," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 316-330.
    18. Matthew Lang & T. Clay McManus & Georg Schaur, 2019. "The effects of import competition on health in the local economy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 44-56, January.
    19. Brian Beach & John Lopresti, 2019. "Losing By Less? Import Competition, Unemployment Insurance Generosity, And Crime," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 1163-1181, April.

  3. McManus, T. Clay & Rao, Justin M., 2015. "Signaling smarts? Revealed preferences for self and social perceptions of intelligence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 110(C), pages 106-118.

    Cited by:

    1. Friedrichsen, Jana & König, Tobias & Schmacker, Renke, 2018. "Social image concerns and welfare take-up," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Behavior SP II 2016-208r, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    2. Goulart, Marco & da Costa, Newton C.A. & Andrade, Eduardo B. & Santos, André A.P., 2015. "Hedging against embarrassment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 310-318.
    3. Jana Friedrichsen & Tobias König & Renke Schmacker, 2017. "Welfare Stigma in the Lab: Evidence of Social Signaling," CESifo Working Paper Series 6519, CESifo.
    4. Montano-Campos, Felipe & Perez-Truglia, Ricardo, 2019. "Giving to charity to signal smarts: evidence from a lab experiment," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 193-199.
    5. Florian H. Schneider, 2020. "Signaling moral values through consumption," ECON - Working Papers 367, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

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