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Auckland Namubi Kuteya

Personal Details

First Name:Auckland
Middle Name:Namubi
Last Name:Kuteya
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pku427
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Indaba Agricultural Policy Research Institute (IAPRI)

Lusaka, Zambia
http://www.iapri.org.zm/
RePEc:edi:iaprizm (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Mason, Nicole M. & Kuteya, Auckland & Ngoma, Hambulo & Tossou, Dagbegnon A. & Baylis, Katharine R., 2020. "Does Shifting to a Flexible E-Voucher Approach Improve Input Subsidy Program Outcomes? Quasi- Experimental Evidence from Zambia's Crop Forecast Surveys," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 303525, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
  2. Nicole M. Mason & Auckland Kuteya & Hambulo Ngoma & Dagbegnon A. Tossou & Katharine R. Baylis, 2020. "Did the e-voucher approach to Zambia's Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP) outperform the traditional FISP? Evidence from the Crop Forecast," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Briefs 303671, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
  3. Mason, Nicole M. & Kuteya, Auckland & Resnick, Danielle & Caputo, Vincenzina & Maredia, Mywish & Shupp, Robert & Ngoma, Hambulo, 2019. "Smallholder Farmers' and Other Agricultural Sector Stakeholders' Priorities for Government Spending: Evidence from Zambia," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 303062, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
  4. Machina, Henry & Ngoma, Hambulo & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2019. "Are Agricultural Subsidies Gender Sensitive? Heterogeneous Impacts of the Farmer Input Support Program in Zambia," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 303044, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
  5. Machina, Henry & Ngoma, Hambulo & Kuteya, Aukland, 2017. "Gendered impacts of agricultural subsidies in Zambia," MPRA Paper 87099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Samboko, Paul & Chapoto, Antony & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Mweemba, Bruno & Munsaka, Eustensia, 2016. "The Impact of Power Rationing on Zambia's Agricultural Sector," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245111, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  7. Chapoto, Antony & Zulu-Mbata, Olipa & Hoffman, Barak D. & Kabaghe, Chance & Sitko, Nicholas & Kuteya, Auckland & Zulu, Ballard, 2015. "The Politics of Maize in Zambia: Who holds the Keys to Change the Status Quo?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 212905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  8. Chapoto, Antony & Chisanga, Brian & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Bumper Harvests a Curse or a Blessing for Zambia: Lessons from the 2014/15 Maize Marketing Season," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 202881, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  9. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Sitko, Nicholas J., 2014. "Creating Scarcity From Abundance: Bumper Harvests, High Prices, And The Role Of State Interventions In Zambian Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 171877, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  10. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2013. "The Maize Price Spike of 2012/13: Understanding the Paradox of High Prices despite Abundant Supplies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171871, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  11. Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Kabwe, Stephen & Kuteya, Auckland N. & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "How Can the Zambian Government Improve the Targeting of the Farmer Input Support Program?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 146939, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  12. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Is the Government of Zambia’s Subsidy to Maize Millers Benefiting Consumers?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 140905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  13. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Trends in Maize Grain, Roller and Breakfast Meal Prices In Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 116908, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

Articles

  1. Matchaya, Greenwell C. & Tadesse, Getaw & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2022. "Rainfall shocks and crop productivity in Zambia: Implication for agricultural water risk management," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 269(C).
  2. Hambulo Ngoma & Henry Machina & Auckland N. Kuteya, 2021. "Can agricultural subsidies reduce gendered productivity gaps? Panel data evidence from Zambia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 39(2), pages 303-323, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Mason, Nicole M. & Kuteya, Auckland & Ngoma, Hambulo & Tossou, Dagbegnon A. & Baylis, Katharine R., 2020. "Does Shifting to a Flexible E-Voucher Approach Improve Input Subsidy Program Outcomes? Quasi- Experimental Evidence from Zambia's Crop Forecast Surveys," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 303525, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

    Cited by:

    1. Bethuel Kinyanjui Kinuthia, 2020. "Agricultural input subsidy and farmers outcomes in Tanzania," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-149, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  2. Mason, Nicole M. & Kuteya, Auckland & Resnick, Danielle & Caputo, Vincenzina & Maredia, Mywish & Shupp, Robert & Ngoma, Hambulo, 2019. "Smallholder Farmers' and Other Agricultural Sector Stakeholders' Priorities for Government Spending: Evidence from Zambia," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 303062, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

    Cited by:

    1. Nicole M. Mason & Ayala Wineman & Solomon T. Tembo, 2020. "Reducing poverty by ‘ignoring the experts’? Evidence on input subsidies in Zambia," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(5), pages 1157-1172, October.

  3. Samboko, Paul & Chapoto, Antony & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Mweemba, Bruno & Munsaka, Eustensia, 2016. "The Impact of Power Rationing on Zambia's Agricultural Sector," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245111, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Bridget Bwalya Umar & Chibuye Florence Kunda-Wamuwi, 2022. "Socio-Economic Effects of Load Shedding on Poor Urban Households and Small Business Enterprises in Lusaka, Zambia," Energy and Environment Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(2), pages 1-20, December.
    2. Ali, Akhter & Rahut, Dil Bahadur & Imtiaz, Muhammad, 2019. "Effects of Pakistan's energy crisis on farm households," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 1-1.
    3. Sudha Bala Krishnan & Teresa Peterburs, 2017. "Zambia Jobs in Value Chains," World Bank Publications - Reports 27007, The World Bank Group.

  4. Chapoto, Antony & Zulu-Mbata, Olipa & Hoffman, Barak D. & Kabaghe, Chance & Sitko, Nicholas & Kuteya, Auckland & Zulu, Ballard, 2015. "The Politics of Maize in Zambia: Who holds the Keys to Change the Status Quo?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 212905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Chamberlin, Jordan & Cunguara, Benedito & Muyanga, Milu & Mangisoni, Julius, 2017. "A comparative political economic analysis of maize sector policies in eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 243-255.
    2. Mwaka Kayula & Collins Otieno Odoyo & Chanda Sichinsambwe, 2022. "Effects of Crop Insurance and Finance on Small-Scale Maize Productivity in Zambia," International Business Research, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 15(10), pages 1-48, October.
    3. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole, 2016. "What Drives Input Subsidy Policy Reform? The Case Of Zambia, 2002-2016," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 246951, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    4. Melkani, Aakanksha & Mason, Nicole & Mather, David & Chisanga, Brian & Jayne, Thom, 2021. "Smallholder Market Participation and Choice of Marketing Channel in the Presence of Liquidity Constraints: Evidence from Zambian Maize Markets," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315273, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Resnick, Danielle & Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Mather, David, 2018. "The Kaleidoscope Model of policy change: Applications to food security policy in Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 101-120.
    6. Gershom Endelani Mwalupaso & Shangao Wang & Aseres Mamo Eshetie & Xu Tian, 2020. "Ameliorating Food and Nutrition Security in Farm Households: Does Informatization Matter?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(2), pages 1-20, January.
    7. Franklin Simtowe & Hugo Groote, 2021. "Seasonal participation in maize markets in Zambia: Do agricultural input subsidies and gender matter?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 13(1), pages 141-155, February.
    8. Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma & Thelma, Antony, 2016. "Improved Agricultural Technology Adoption in Zambia: Are Women Farmers Being Left Behind?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245916, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole M., 2016. "What drives input subsidy policy reform? The case of Zambia, 2002–2016," IFPRI discussion papers 1572, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Jody Harris & Brian Chisanga & Scott Drimie & Gina Kennedy, 2019. "Nutrition transition in Zambia: Changing food supply, food prices, household consumption, diet and nutrition outcomes," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 11(2), pages 371-387, April.

  5. Chapoto, Antony & Chisanga, Brian & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Bumper Harvests a Curse or a Blessing for Zambia: Lessons from the 2014/15 Maize Marketing Season," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 202881, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Mulungu, Kelvin & Ng'ombe, John, 2019. "Climate Change Impacts on Sustainable Maize Production in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review," AgriXiv f8pma, Center for Open Science.
    2. Chisanga, Brian & Chapoto, Antony, 2015. "2015/16 Zambian Maize Market Outlook and Regional Analysis," Miscellaneous Publications 211219, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Chapoto, Antony & Zulu-Mbata, Olipa & Hoffman, Barak D. & Kabaghe, Chance & Sitko, Nicholas & Kuteya, Auckland & Zulu, Ballard, 2015. "The Politics of Maize in Zambia: Who holds the Keys to Change the Status Quo?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 212905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

  6. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Sitko, Nicholas J., 2014. "Creating Scarcity From Abundance: Bumper Harvests, High Prices, And The Role Of State Interventions In Zambian Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 171877, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Chamberlin, Jordan & Cunguara, Benedito & Muyanga, Milu & Mangisoni, Julius, 2017. "A comparative political economic analysis of maize sector policies in eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 243-255.

  7. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2013. "The Maize Price Spike of 2012/13: Understanding the Paradox of High Prices despite Abundant Supplies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171871, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Sitko, Nicholas J., 2014. "Creating Scarcity From Abundance: Bumper Harvests, High Prices, And The Role Of State Interventions In Zambian Maize Markets," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 171877, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Chapoto, Antony & Chisanga, Brian & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Bumper Harvests a Curse or a Blessing for Zambia: Lessons from the 2014/15 Maize Marketing Season," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 202881, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Fung, Winnie & Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Mason, Nicole & Uwaifo Oyelere, Ruth, 2015. "Can Crop Purchase Programs Reduce Poverty and Improve Welfare in Rural Communities? Evidence from the Food Reserve Agency in Zambia," IZA Discussion Papers 9361, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Nicholas Sitko & Jordan Chamberlin, 2015. "The Anatomy of Medium-Scale Farm Growth in Zambia: What Are the Implications for the Future of Smallholder Agriculture?," Land, MDPI, vol. 4(3), pages 1-19, September.
    5. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Chisanga, Brian, 2016. "How Is Multinational Investment in Grain and Oilseed Trading Reshaping the Smallholder Markets in Zambia?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 234948, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Chamberlin, Jordan & Mulenga, Brian, 2015. "Unpacking the Growth of Medium-scale Farms Zambia: What Are the Implications for the Future of Smallholder Agriculture?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 212901, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

  8. Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Kabwe, Stephen & Kuteya, Auckland N. & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "How Can the Zambian Government Improve the Targeting of the Farmer Input Support Program?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 146939, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole, 2016. "What Drives Input Subsidy Policy Reform? The Case Of Zambia, 2002-2016," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 246951, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    2. Resnick, Danielle & Haggblade, Steven & Babu, Suresh & Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Mather, David, 2018. "The Kaleidoscope Model of policy change: Applications to food security policy in Zambia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 101-120.
    3. Mari Kangasniemi & Helen Barnes & Gemma Wright & Michell Mpike, 2015. "Tax-benefit microsimulation modelling in Zambia: A feasibility study," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-121, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Ching-Sheng Hsu & Shu-Fen Tu & Zhao-Ji Huang, 2020. "Design of an E-Voucher System for Supporting Social Welfare Using Blockchain Technology," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(8), pages 1-22, April.
    5. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, T.S. & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda, 2013. "A Review of Zambia’s Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs: Targeting, Impacts, and the Way Forward," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 162438, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Kristi Mahrt & Gibson Masumbu, 2015. "Estimating multidimensional poverty in Zambia," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2015-137, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole M., 2016. "What drives input subsidy policy reform? The case of Zambia, 2002–2016," IFPRI discussion papers 1572, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Gershom Endelani Mwalupaso & Shangao Wang & Zhangxing Xu & Xu Tian, 2019. "Towards Auspicious Agricultural Informatization—Implication of Farmers’ Behavioral Intention Apropos of Mobile Phone Use in Agriculture," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(22), pages 1-21, November.
    9. Sudha Bala Krishnan & Teresa Peterburs, 2017. "Zambia Jobs in Value Chains," World Bank Publications - Reports 27007, The World Bank Group.
    10. Paul Mosley & Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai, 2016. "The political economy of 'linked' progressive taxation in Africa and Latin America," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2016-131, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  9. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Is the Government of Zambia’s Subsidy to Maize Millers Benefiting Consumers?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 140905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Chamberlin, Jordan & Cunguara, Benedito & Muyanga, Milu & Mangisoni, Julius, 2017. "A comparative political economic analysis of maize sector policies in eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 243-255.
    2. Chapoto, Antony & Chisanga, Brian & Kuteya, Auckland & Kabwe, Stephen, 2015. "Bumper Harvests a Curse or a Blessing for Zambia: Lessons from the 2014/15 Maize Marketing Season," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 202881, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Alfani, Federica & Arslan, Aslihan & McCarthy, Nancy & Cavatassi, Romina & Sitko, Nicholas, 2021. "Climate resilience in rural Zambia: evaluating farmers’ response to El Niño-induced drought," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(5-6), pages 582-604, October.

  10. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Trends in Maize Grain, Roller and Breakfast Meal Prices In Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 116908, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Kuteya, Auckland N. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "Is the Government of Zambia’s Subsidy to Maize Millers Benefiting Consumers?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 140905, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Chisanga, Brian & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Chapoto, Antony, 2015. "The Paradox of High Mealie Meal Prices amidst Abundance: Maize Grain to," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 208577, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

Articles

  1. Hambulo Ngoma & Henry Machina & Auckland N. Kuteya, 2021. "Can agricultural subsidies reduce gendered productivity gaps? Panel data evidence from Zambia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 39(2), pages 303-323, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Ikhide, Emily Edoisa & Umaru, Ezra K. & Oyebola, Fehintola & Omoju, Oluwasola E., 2021. "A CGE Analysis of the Gender Productivity Gap in Nigeria’s Agriculture Sector," 2021 Conference, August 17-31, 2021, Virtual 315922, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (11) 2011-11-07 2013-01-07 2013-04-20 2014-06-22 2014-08-16 2015-12-01 2016-10-02 2018-10-08 2020-05-11 2020-05-18 2020-05-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AFR: Africa (6) 2011-11-07 2013-01-07 2013-04-20 2014-06-22 2015-05-16 2016-10-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEV: Development (2) 2018-10-08 2020-05-11
  4. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (1) 2016-10-02
  5. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-05-11
  6. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2018-10-08

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