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How Can the Zambian Government Improve the Targeting of the Farmer Input Support Program?

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  • Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda
  • Kabwe, Stephen
  • Kuteya, Auckland N.
  • Mason, Nicole M.

Abstract

The Farmer Input Support Program (FISP, formerly the Fertilizer Support Program) has expanded the scale of its fertilizer distribution from 48,000 metric tons (MT) in 2002/03, when the program started, to nearly 183,000 MT in the 2012/2013 farming season. Yet, after more than a decade of input subsidies, rural poverty rates have remained persistently high at around 80%. Poor targeting of FISP inputs may partially explain the lack of progress on addressing persistently high rural poverty levels over the last decade.

Suggested Citation

  • Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Kabwe, Stephen & Kuteya, Auckland N. & Mason, Nicole M., 2013. "How Can the Zambian Government Improve the Targeting of the Farmer Input Support Program?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 146939, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcpb:146939
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/146939
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Shipekesa, Arthur M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "The 2011 Surplus in Smallholder Maize Production in Zambia: Drivers, Beneficiaries, & Implications for Agricultural & Poverty Reduction Policies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 118477, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Bwalya, Richard & Kamwanga, Jolly & Wamulume, Mukata, 2012. "Assessing the Feasibility of Implementing the Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP) Through an Electronic Voucher System in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 123210, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Burke, William J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Sitko, Nicholas J., 2012. "Can the FISP More Effectively Achieve Food Production and Poverty Reduction Goals?," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 123208, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Nicole M. Mason & Thomas S. Jayne, 2014. "Fertiliser subsidies and smallholder commercial fertiliser purchases: crowding out, leakage, and policy implications for Zambia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 527-528, June.
    5. Zhiying Xu & William J. Burke & Thomas S. Jayne & Jones Govereh, 2009. "Do input subsidy programs "crowd in" or "crowd out" commercial market development? Modeling fertilizer demand in a two-channel marketing system," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(1), pages 79-94, January.
    6. Burke, William J. & Jayne, Thomas S. & Black, J. Roy, 2012. "Getting More “Bang for the Buck”: Diversifying Subsidies Beyond Fertilizer and Policy Beyond Subsidies," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 123209, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sudha Bala Krishnan & Teresa Peterburs, 2017. "Zambia Jobs in Value Chains," World Bank Other Operational Studies 27007, The World Bank.
    2. Kristi Mahrt & Gibson Masumbu, 2015. "Estimating multidimensional poverty in Zambia," WIDER Working Paper Series 137, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole M., 2016. "What drives input subsidy policy reform? The case of Zambia, 2002–2016," IFPRI discussion papers 1572, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Resnick, Danielle & Mason, Nicole, 2016. "What Drives Input Subsidy Policy Reform? The Case Of Zambia, 2002-2016," Miscellaneous Publications 246951, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, T.S. & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda, 2013. "A Review of Zambia’s Agricultural Input Subsidy Programs: Targeting, Impacts, and the Way Forward," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 162438, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Paul Mosley & Abdul-Gafaru Abdulai, 2016. "The political economy of 'linked' progressive taxation in Africa and Latin America," WIDER Working Paper Series 131, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy;

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