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Kei Kawai

Personal Details

First Name:Kei
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kawai
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pka736
https://files.nyu.edu/kk2319/public/index.html
Terminal Degree:2011 Department of Economics; Northwestern University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Economics Department
Stern School of Business
New York University (NYU)

New York City, New York (United States)
http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/economics/
RePEc:edi:ednyuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sylvain Chassang & Kei Kawai & Jun Nakabayashi & Juan M. Ortner, 2019. "Data Driven Regulation: Theory and Application to Missing Bids," NBER Working Papers 25654, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kosuke Uetake & Ken ONISHI & Kei Kawai, 2013. "Signaling in Online Credit Markets," 2013 Meeting Papers 516, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Kei Kawai, 2013. "Campaign Finance in U.S. House Elections," 2013 Meeting Papers 1158, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Yasutora Watanabe & Kei Kawai, 2010. "Voter Turnout and Social Learning in Sequential Election: The Case of U.S. Presidential Primaries," 2010 Meeting Papers 874, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Yasutora Watanabe & Kei Kawai, 2009. "Inferring Strategic Voting," 2009 Meeting Papers 803, Society for Economic Dynamics.

Articles

  1. Kei Kawai & Yasutora Watanabe, 2013. "Inferring Strategic Voting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 624-662, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Kei Kawai & Yasutora Watanabe, 2013. "Inferring Strategic Voting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 624-662, April.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Inferring Strategic Voting (AER 2013) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Sylvain Chassang & Kei Kawai & Jun Nakabayashi & Juan M. Ortner, 2019. "Data Driven Regulation: Theory and Application to Missing Bids," NBER Working Papers 25654, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Kory Kroft & Yao Luo & Magne Mogstad & Bradley Setzler, 2020. "Imperfect Competition and Rents in Labor and Product Markets: The Case of the Construction Industry," NBER Working Papers 27325, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Hannes Wallimann & David Imhof & Martin Huber, 2020. "A Machine Learning Approach for Flagging Incomplete Bid-rigging Cartels," Papers 2004.05629, arXiv.org.
    3. de Leverano, Adriano, 2019. "Collusion through market sharing agreements: Evidence from Quebec's road paving market," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-053, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Francesco Decarolis & Cristina Giorgiantonio, 2020. "Corruption red flags in public procurement: new evidence from Italian calls for tenders," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 544, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    5. Huang, Yangguang, 2019. "An empirical study of scoring auctions and quality manipulation corruption," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    6. Robert Clark & Decio Coviello & Adriano De Leverano, 2020. "Complementary bidding and the collusive arrangement: Evidence from an antitrust investigation," Working Paper 1446, Economics Department, Queen's University.
    7. David Imhof & Hannes Wallimann, 2021. "Detecting bid-rigging coalitions in different countries and auction formats," Papers 2105.00337, arXiv.org.

  2. Kosuke Uetake & Ken ONISHI & Kei Kawai, 2013. "Signaling in Online Credit Markets," 2013 Meeting Papers 516, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Minkyung Kim & K. Sudhir & Kosuke Uetake & Rodrigo Canales, 2016. "Multidimensional Sales Incentives in CRM Settings: Customer Adverse Selection and Moral Hazard," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 2085, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    2. Freedman, Seth & Jin, Ginger Zhe, 2017. "The information value of online social networks: Lessons from peer-to-peer lending," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 185-222.
    3. Tobias Berg & Valentin Burg & Ana Gombović & Manju Puri, 2020. "On the Rise of FinTechs: Credit Scoring Using Digital Footprints," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 33(7), pages 2845-2897.
    4. Lingfang (Ivy) Li & Steven Tadelis & Xiaolan Zhou, 2016. "Buying Reputation as a Signal of Quality: Evidence from an Online Marketplace," NBER Working Papers 22584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Zhao, Yunhui, 2016. "Got Hurt for What You Paid? Revisiting Government Subsidy in the U.S. Mortgage Market," MPRA Paper 81083, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Aug 2017.
    6. Bryan Bollinger & Song Yao, 2018. "Risk transfer versus cost reduction on two-sided microfinance platforms," Quantitative Marketing and Economics (QME), Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 251-287, September.
    7. Matthew Backus & Tom Blake & Steven Tadelis, 2015. "Cheap Talk, Round Numbers, and the Economics of Negotiation," NBER Working Papers 21285, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Li, Zhiyong & Zhang, Haiyang & Yu, Mei & Wang, Hairan, 2019. "Too long to be true in the description? Evidence from a Peer-to-Peer platform in China," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 246-251.
    9. Alexander W. Butler & Jess Cornaggia & Umit G. Gurun, 2017. "Do Local Capital Market Conditions Affect Consumers’ Borrowing Decisions?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 63(12), pages 4175-4187, December.
    10. Runshan Fu & Yan Huang & Param Vir Singh, 2020. "Crowd, Lending, Machine, and Bias," Papers 2008.04068, arXiv.org.

  3. Kei Kawai, 2013. "Campaign Finance in U.S. House Elections," 2013 Meeting Papers 1158, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Laurent Bouton & Micael Castanheira De Moura & Allan Drazen, 2020. "A Theory of Small Campaign Contributions," Working Papers ECARES 2020-43, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

  4. Yasutora Watanabe & Kei Kawai, 2009. "Inferring Strategic Voting," 2009 Meeting Papers 803, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Spenkuch, Jörg, 2013. "On the Extent of Strategic Voting," MPRA Paper 50198, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sebastien Courtin & Matias Nunez, 2013. "A Map of Approval Voting Equilibria Outcomes," Working Papers hal-00914887, HAL.
    3. Bouton, Laurent & Castanheira, Micael & Llorente-Saguer, Aniol, 2012. "Divided Majority and Information Aggregation: Theory and Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 9234, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Bouton, Laurent & Gratton, Gabriele, 2015. "Majority runoff elections: strategic voting and Duverger's hypothesis," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 10(2), May.
    5. Hughes, Niall, 2015. "Voting In Legislative Elections Under Plurality Rule," CRETA Online Discussion Paper Series 03, Centre for Research in Economic Theory and its Applications CRETA.
    6. Larry G. Epstein & Hiroaki Kaido & Kyoungwon Seo, 2015. "Robust Confidence Regions for Incomplete Models," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series wp2015-008, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    7. Gianmarco Daniele & Amedeo Piolatto & Willem Sas, 2018. "Who Sent You? Strategic Voting, Transfers and Bailouts in a Federation," Working Papers. Serie AD 2018-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    8. Evrenk, Haldun & Sher, Chien-Yuan, 2015. "Social interactions in voting behavior: distinguishing between strategic voting and the bandwagon effect," MPRA Paper 62794, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Bordignon, Massimo & Nannicini, Tommaso & Tabellini, Guido, 2017. "Single round vs. runoff elections under plurality rule: A theoretical analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 123-133.
    10. Núñez, Matías & Pivato, Marcus, 2019. "Truth-revealing voting rules for large populations," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 285-305.
    11. Eiselt, H.A. & Marianov, Vladimir, 2020. "Maximizing political vote in multiple districts," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    12. Andreu ARENAS, 2016. "Sticky Votes," LIDAM Reprints CORE 2763, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    13. Tuukka Saarimaa & Janne Tukiainen, 2013. "Local representation and strategic voting: evidence from electoral boundary reforms," Working Papers 2013/32, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    14. Marcelo Tyszler & Arthur Schram, 2016. "Information and strategic voting," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(2), pages 360-381, June.
    15. Bouton, Laurent & Castanheira, Micael & Llorente-Saguer, Aniol, 2017. "Multicandidate elections: Aggregate uncertainty in the laboratory," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 132-150.
    16. Casas, Agustín & Díaz, Guillermo & Trindade, André, 2017. "Who monitors the monitor? Effect of party observers on electoral outcomes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 136-149.
    17. Gianmarco Daniele & Amedeo Piolatto & Willem Sas, 2020. "Does the winner take it all? Redistributive policies and political extremism," Working Papers 2020/01, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    18. Francesca Molinari, 2020. "Microeconometrics with Partial Identi?cation," CeMMAP working papers CWP15/20, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    19. Arnaud Dellis & Mandar Oak, 2013. "Multiple Votes, Multiple Candidacies and Polarization," School of Economics Working Papers 2013-02, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    20. Isaiah Andrews & Matthew Gentzkow & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2014. "Measuring the Sensitivity of Parameter Estimates to Estimation Moments," NBER Working Papers 20673, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Fiva, Jon H. & Folke, Olle, 2016. "Mechanical and Psychological Effects of Electoral Reform," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(2), pages 265-279, April.
    22. Santosh Anagol & Thomas Fujiwara, 2014. "The Runner-Up Effect," NBER Working Papers 20261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    23. Gordon, Brett R. & Hartmann, Wesley R., 2013. "Advertising Competition in Presidential Elections," Research Papers 2131, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    24. Matthew Interis & Chang Xu & Daniel Petrolia & Kalyn Coatney, 2016. "Examining unconditional preference revelation in choice experiments: a voting game approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 125-142, March.
    25. Hiroaki Kaido & Yi Zhang, 2019. "Robust likelihood ratio tests for incomplete economic models," CeMMAP working papers CWP68/19, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    26. Martin Gregor, 2013. "The Optimal Ballot Structure for Double-Member Districts," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp493, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    27. Hiroaki Kaido & Jiaxuan Li & Marc Rysman, 2018. "Moment Inequalities in the Context of Simulated and Predicted Variables," Papers 1804.03674, arXiv.org.
    28. Yasunori Okumura, 2019. "What proportion of sincere voters guarantees efficiency?," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 53(2), pages 299-311, August.
    29. Francesca Molinari, 2019. "Econometrics with Partial Identification," CeMMAP working papers CWP25/19, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    30. Ricardo Troncoso Sepúlveda, 2019. "Estimación del voto estratégico en elecciones parlamentarias chilenas 2013," Revista Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, vol. 27(1), pages 169-184, February.
    31. He, Yinghua, 2015. "Gaming the Boston School Choice Mechanism in Beijing," TSE Working Papers 15-551, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Sep 2017.
    32. Lyytikainen, Teemu & Tukiainen, Janne, 2019. "Are voters rational?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100217, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    33. Bouton, Laurent & Ogden, Benjamin, 2017. "Ethical Voting in Multicandidate Elections," CEPR Discussion Papers 12374, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    34. Furukawa, Chishio, 2019. "Publication Bias under Aggregation Frictions: Theory, Evidence, and a New Correction Method," EconStor Preprints 194798, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    35. Laurent Bouton & Benjamin G. Ogden, 2017. "Group-based Voting in Multicandidate Elections," NBER Working Papers 23898, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    36. Katherine Silz Carson & Susan M. Chilton & W. George Hutchinson & Riccardo Scarpa, 2020. "Public resource allocation, strategic behavior, and status quo bias in choice experiments," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 185(1), pages 1-19, October.
    37. E. Glen Weyl, 2017. "The robustness of quadratic voting," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 172(1), pages 75-107, July.
    38. Spenkuch, Jörg L., 2018. "Expressive vs. strategic voters: An empirical assessment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 73-81.

Articles

  1. Kei Kawai & Yasutora Watanabe, 2013. "Inferring Strategic Voting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(2), pages 624-662, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2013-11-29
  2. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2013-11-29
  3. NEP-DES: Economic Design (1) 2019-03-25
  4. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (1) 2019-03-25

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