IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pde1345.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Michiel de Haas

Personal Details

First Name:Michiel
Middle Name:
Last Name:de Haas
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pde1345
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://sites.google.com/view/michieldehaas
Twitter: @michieldehaas

Affiliation

Sectie Economie
Wageningen Universiteit en Researchcentrum

Wageningen, Netherlands
https://www.wur.nl/en/Research-Results/Chair-groups/Social-Sciences/Section-Economics.htm
RePEc:edi:sewurnl (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bolt, Jutta & De Haas, Michiel & Hillbom, Ellen & Tadei, Federico, 2021. "Measuring historical income inequality in Africa: What can we learn from social tables?," CEPR Discussion Papers 16218, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. de Haas, Michiel, 2020. "The Failure of Cotton Imperialism in Africa: Did Agricultural Seasonality undermine Colonial Exports?," African Economic History Working Paper 59/2020, African Economic History Network.
  3. Baten, Joerg & de Haas, Michiel & Kempter, Elisabeth & Meier zu Selhausen, Felix, 2020. "Educational Gender Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Long-term Perspective," African Economic History Working Paper 54/2019, African Economic History Network.
  4. Michiel de Haas & Kostadis J. Papaioannou, 2017. "Resource endowments and agricultural commercialization in colonial Africa: Did labour seasonality and food security drive Uganda’s cotton revolution?," Working Papers 0111, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  5. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather shocks and agricultural commercialization in colonial tropical Africa: did cash crops alleviate social distress?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 74029, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. de Haas , Michiel & Frankema , Ewout, 2016. "Tracing the uneven diffusion of missionary education in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of church record data," African Economic History Working Paper 25/2016, African Economic History Network.
  7. Kostadis J. Papaioannou & Michiel de Haas, 2015. "Climate shocks, cash crops and resilience: Evidence from colonial tropical Africa," Working Papers 0076, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
  8. de Haas, Michiel, 2014. "MEASURING RURAL WELFARE IN COLONIAL UGANDA: Why farmers would not work for wages," African Economic History Working Paper 18/2014, African Economic History Network.

Articles

  1. de Haas, Michiel, 2021. "The Failure of Cotton Imperialism in Africa: Seasonal Constraints and Contrasting Outcomes in French West Africa and British Uganda," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 81(4), pages 1098-1136, December.
  2. Joerg Baten & Michiel de Haas & Elisabeth Kempter & Felix Meier zu Selhausen, 2021. "Educational Gender Inequality in Sub‐Saharan Africa: A Long‐Term Perspective," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 47(3), pages 813-849, September.
  3. Michiel De Haas, 2020. "Stefano Bellucci and Andreas Eckert, eds., General labour history of Africa: workers, employers and governments, 20th–21st centuries (International Labour Organization: Boydell & Brewer, 2019. Pp. v+7," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(2), pages 616-618, May.
  4. Michiel De Haas & Ewout Frankema, 2018. "Gender, ethnicity, and unequal opportunity in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of parish register data," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(3), pages 965-994, August.
  5. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather Shocks and Agricultural Commercialization in Colonial Tropical Africa: Did Cash Crops Alleviate Social Distress?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 346-365.
  6. Michiel Haas, 2017. "Measuring rural welfare in colonial Africa: did Uganda's smallholders thrive?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(2), pages 605-631, May.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Baten, Joerg & de Haas, Michiel & Kempter, Elisabeth & Meier zu Selhausen, Felix, 2020. "Educational Gender Inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Long-term Perspective," African Economic History Working Paper 54/2019, African Economic History Network.

    Cited by:

    1. Remi Jedwab & Felix Meier zu Selhausen & Alexander Moradi, 2018. "The Economics of Missionary Expansion: Evidence from Africa and Implications for Development," CSAE Working Paper Series 2018-07, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. David K. Evans & Maryam Akmal & Pamela Jakiela, 2020. "Gender Gaps in Education: The Long View," Working Papers 523, Center for Global Development.

  2. Michiel de Haas & Kostadis J. Papaioannou, 2017. "Resource endowments and agricultural commercialization in colonial Africa: Did labour seasonality and food security drive Uganda’s cotton revolution?," Working Papers 0111, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

  3. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather shocks and agricultural commercialization in colonial tropical Africa: did cash crops alleviate social distress?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 74029, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Cited by:

    1. He, Xi & Chen, Zhenshan, 2022. "Weather, cropland expansion, and deforestation in Ethiopia," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 111(C).
    2. Eichsteller, Marta & Njagi, Tim & Nyukuri, Elvin, 2022. "The role of agriculture in poverty escapes in Kenya – Developing a capabilities approach in the context of climate change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 149(C).
    3. Hyland, Marie & Russ, Jason, 2019. "Water as destiny – The long-term impacts of drought in sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 30-45.
    4. van Weezel, Stijn, 2020. "Local warming and violent armed conflict in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 126(C).
    5. Nick Vink, 2022. "African agricultural development: How are we contributing?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 53(4), pages 540-562, July.
    6. Michiel de Haas & Kostadis J. Papaioannou, 2017. "Resource endowments and agricultural commercialization in colonial Africa: Did labour seasonality and food security drive Uganda’s cotton revolution?," Working Papers 0111, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    7. Lingjuan Cheng & Wei Zou & Kaifeng Duan, 2021. "The Influence of New Agricultural Business Entities on the Economic Welfare of Farmer’s Families," Agriculture, MDPI, vol. 11(9), pages 1-15, September.

  4. de Haas , Michiel & Frankema , Ewout, 2016. "Tracing the uneven diffusion of missionary education in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of church record data," African Economic History Working Paper 25/2016, African Economic History Network.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriele Cappelli & Jörg Baten, 2017. "European Trade, Colonialism and Human Capital Accumulation in Senegal, Gambia and Western Mali, 1770 - 1900," CESifo Working Paper Series 6468, CESifo.
    2. Felix Meier zu Selhausen & Marco H. D. van Leeuwen & Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2018. "Social mobility among Christian Africans: evidence from Anglican marriage registers in Uganda, 1895–2011," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1291-1321, November.

  5. Kostadis J. Papaioannou & Michiel de Haas, 2015. "Climate shocks, cash crops and resilience: Evidence from colonial tropical Africa," Working Papers 0076, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Haile, B. & Azzarri, C. & Heady, D. & You, L., 2018. "Climate, climate shocks and child nutrition in Africa’s diverse farming systems," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275928, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Kostadis J. Papaioannou, 2017. "“Hunger makes a thief of any man”: Poverty and crime in British colonial Asia," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-28.
    3. Khalifa, Sherin & Petri, Svetlana & Henning, Christian H. C. A., 2020. "Climate change, or climate shocks: What really triggers civil conflicts?," Working Papers of Agricultural Policy WP2020-04, University of Kiel, Department of Agricultural Economics, Chair of Agricultural Policy.

  6. de Haas, Michiel, 2014. "MEASURING RURAL WELFARE IN COLONIAL UGANDA: Why farmers would not work for wages," African Economic History Working Paper 18/2014, African Economic History Network.

    Cited by:

Articles

  1. Joerg Baten & Michiel de Haas & Elisabeth Kempter & Felix Meier zu Selhausen, 2021. "Educational Gender Inequality in Sub‐Saharan Africa: A Long‐Term Perspective," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 47(3), pages 813-849, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Michiel De Haas & Ewout Frankema, 2018. "Gender, ethnicity, and unequal opportunity in colonial Uganda: European influences, African realities, and the pitfalls of parish register data," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(3), pages 965-994, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Meier zu Selhausen, Felix, 2019. "Missions, Education and Conversion in Colonial Africa," African Economic History Working Paper 48/2019, African Economic History Network.
    2. Frankema, Ewout & Van Waijenburg, Marlous, 2019. "The Great Convergence. Skill Accumulation and Mass Education in Africa and Asia, 1870-2010," CEPR Discussion Papers 14150, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather Shocks and Agricultural Commercialization in Colonial Tropical Africa: Did Cash Crops Alleviate Social Distress?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 346-365.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Michiel Haas, 2017. "Measuring rural welfare in colonial Africa: did Uganda's smallholders thrive?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 70(2), pages 605-631, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Papaioannou, Kostadis J. & de Haas, Michiel, 2017. "Weather Shocks and Agricultural Commercialization in Colonial Tropical Africa: Did Cash Crops Alleviate Social Distress?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 346-365.
    2. Bolt, Jutta & Gardner, Leigh, 2020. "How Africans shaped British colonial institutions: evidence from local taxation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 107519, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Maria Mwaipopo Fibaek, 2021. "Working Poor? A Study of Rural Workers' Economic Welfare in Kenya," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(1), pages 41-69, January.
    4. Federico Tadei, 2022. "Colonizer identity and trade in Africa: Were the British more favourable to free trade?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 75(2), pages 561-578, May.
    5. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2022. "Economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1885–2008: Evidence from eight countries," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 83(C).
    6. Felix Meier zu Selhausen & Marco H. D. van Leeuwen & Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2018. "Social mobility among Christian Africans: evidence from Anglican marriage registers in Uganda, 1895–2011," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 71(4), pages 1291-1321, November.
    7. Stephen Broadberry & Leigh Gardner, 2019. "Economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1885-2008," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _169, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Laura Maravall, 2020. "Factor endowments on the ‘frontier’: Algerian settler agriculture at the beginning of the 1900s," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(3), pages 758-784, August.
    9. Corinne Boter, 2020. "Living standards and the life cycle: reconstructing household income and consumption in the early twentieth‐century Netherlands," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 73(4), pages 1050-1073, November.
    10. Johan Fourie & Nonso Obikili, 2019. "Decolonizing with data: The cliometric turn in African economic history," Working Papers 02/2019, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    11. Bolt, Jutta & Gardner, Leigh, 2019. "African institutions under colonial rule," CEPR Discussion Papers 14198, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Michiel de Haas & Kostadis J. Papaioannou, 2017. "Resource endowments and agricultural commercialization in colonial Africa: Did labour seasonality and food security drive Uganda’s cotton revolution?," Working Papers 0111, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    13. Aboagye, Prince Young & Bolt, Jutta, 2021. "Long-term trends in income inequality: Winners and losers of economic change in Ghana, 1891–1960," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 82(C).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (3) 2015-11-21 2017-04-30 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2015-11-21 2017-04-30 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (3) 2015-11-21 2017-04-30 2019-02-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (2) 2015-11-21 2019-02-25. Author is listed

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Michiel de Haas should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.