IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pje100.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Thomas Jensen

Personal Details

First Name:Thomas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Jensen
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pje100
http://www.econ.ku.dk/tjensen/

Affiliation

Økonomisk Institut
Københavns Universitet

København, Denmark
http://www.econ.ku.dk/

: (+45) 35 32 30 10
(+45) 35 32 30 00
Øster Farimagsgade 5, building 26,, 1453 København K
RePEc:edi:okokudk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Thomas Jensen & Andreas Madum, 2014. "Partisan Optimism and Political Bargaining," Discussion Papers 14-05, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  2. Thomas Jensen, 2013. "Elections, Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality," Discussion Papers 13-03, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  3. Thomas Jensen, 2012. "National Responses to Transnational Terrorism: Intelligence and Counterterrorism Provision," Discussion Papers 12-22, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  4. Thomas Jensen & Asger Lau Andersen, 2010. "Exit Polls and Voter Turnout," EPRU Working Paper Series 2010-10, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  5. Thomas Jensen, 2009. "Electoral Competition when Candidates are Better Informed than Voters," EPRU Working Paper Series 2009-06, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  6. Thomas Jensen, 2007. "Projection Effects and Strategic Ambiguity in Electoral Competition," Discussion Papers 07-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  7. Thomas Jensen, 2007. "Elections, Private Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality," Discussion Papers 07-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  8. Thomas Jensen, 2007. "Terrorism, Anti-Terrorism, and the Copycat Effect," Discussion Papers 07-14, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  9. Thomas Jensen, 2005. "Can Ambiguity in Electoral Competition be Explained by Projection Effects in Voters' Perceptions?," Discussion Papers 05-25, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Thomas Jensen, 2011. "Optimal counterterrorism and the recruitment effect of large terrorist attacks: A simple dynamic model," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 23(1), pages 69-86, January.
  2. Thomas Jensen, 2009. "Projection effects and strategic ambiguity in electoral competition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 213-232, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Thomas Jensen, 2013. "Elections, Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality," Discussion Papers 13-03, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Tilman Klumpp, 2011. "Populism, Partisanship, and the Funding of Political Campaigns," Emory Economics 1107, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).

  2. Thomas Jensen, 2009. "Electoral Competition when Candidates are Better Informed than Voters," EPRU Working Paper Series 2009-06, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Guido Merzoni & Federico Trombetta, 2016. "The cost of doing the right thing. A model of populism with rent-seeking politicians and the economic crisis," DISEIS - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo dis1602, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimento di Economia internazionale, delle istituzioni e dello sviluppo (DISEIS).
    2. Honryo, Takakazu, 2013. "Signaling Competence in Elections," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 442, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    3. Krasa, Stefan & Polborn, Mattias K., 2012. "Political competition between differentiated candidates," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 249-271.

  3. Thomas Jensen, 2007. "Projection Effects and Strategic Ambiguity in Electoral Competition," Discussion Papers 07-12, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Burkhard Schipper & Hee Yeul Woo, 2012. "Political Awareness and Microtargeting of Voters in Electoral Competition," Working Papers 124, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    2. Nichole Szembrot, 2017. "Are voters cursed when politicians conceal policy preferences?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 173(1), pages 25-41, October.
    3. Maarten C. W. Janssen & Mariya Teteryatnikova, 2015. "On the Positive Role of Negative Political Campaigning," Vienna Economics Papers 1506, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    4. Burkhard Schipper & Hee Yeul Woo, 2017. "Political Awareness, Microtargeting of Voters, and Negative Electoral Campaigning," Working Papers 173, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    5. Rothengatter, Marloes, 2016. "Insights in cognitive patterns : Essays on heuristics and identification," Other publications TiSEM 5f812a9d-8968-48b8-8d1b-0, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. Maarten C. W. Janssen & Mariya Teteryatnikova, 2017. "Mystifying but not misleading: when does political ambiguity not confuse voters?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 172(3), pages 501-524, September.

  4. Thomas Jensen, 2007. "Elections, Private Information, and State-Dependent Candidate Quality," Discussion Papers 07-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Denter, Philipp, 2013. "A theory of communication in political campaigns," Economics Working Paper Series 1302, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.

Articles

  1. Thomas Jensen, 2009. "Projection effects and strategic ambiguity in electoral competition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 213-232, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 9 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (8) 2005-12-20 2007-08-18 2007-08-18 2007-08-18 2009-09-11 2010-10-16 2013-06-24 2014-03-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (7) 2005-12-20 2007-08-18 2007-08-18 2009-09-11 2010-10-16 2013-06-24 2014-03-30. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (2) 2009-09-11 2013-06-24
  4. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2009-09-11
  5. NEP-MKT: Marketing (1) 2005-12-20

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Thomas Jensen should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.