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Pathways to African Export Sustainability

  • Paul Brenton
  • Olivier Cadot
  • Martha Denisse Pierola

This report provides tentative leads toward such policy prescriptions, based on an overview of the empirical evidence. Chapter one sets the stage by putting Africa's export-survival performance into perspective and proposing a framework that will guide the interpretation of empirical evidence throughout the report. Chapter two covers country-level determinants of export sustainability at origin and destination, including the exporting country's business environment. Chapter three explores some of the firm-level evidence on what drives export sustainability, including uncertainty, incomplete contracts, learning, and networks. Finally, chapter four offers tentative policy implications. The main conclusions from this overview of the causes of Africa's low export sustainability should be taken with caution both because of the complexity of the issue and because of the very fragmentary evidence on which the overview is based. The author should be more cautious in drawing policy implications, as hasty policy prescriptions are the most common trap into which reports of this kind can fall. A first, solid conclusion is that the author needs substantial additional work on the nature and causes of low export survival rates in developing countries to determine the path to high export sustainability.

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 9380 and published in 2012.
ISBN: 978-0-8213-9559-2
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:9380
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  1. Mélise Jaud & Olivier Cadot & Akiko Suwa-Eisenmann, 2009. "Do food scares explain supplier concentration? An analysis of EU agri-food imports," PSE Working Papers halshs-00574963, HAL.
  2. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2006. "Globalization and the Gains from Variety," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(2), pages 541-585, May.
  3. Paul Brenton & Christian Saborowski & Erik von Uexkull, 2010. "What Explains the Low Survival Rate of Developing Country Export Flows?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 24(3), pages 474-499, December.
  4. Egan, Mary Lou & Mody, Ashoka, 1992. "Buyer-seller links in export development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 321-334, March.
  5. Jaud, Melise & Cadot, Olivier, 2011. "A second look at the pesticides initiative program : evidence from Senegal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5635, The World Bank.
  6. Olivier Cadot & Leonardo Iacovone & Denisse Pierola & Ferdinand Rauch, 2011. "Success and Failure of African Exporters," CEP Discussion Papers dp1054, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  7. Olivier Cadot & Ana M. Fernandes & Julien Gourdon & Aaditya Mattoo, 2011. "Where to Spend the Next Million? Applying Impact Evaluation to Trade Assistance," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 16358.
  8. Mélise Jaud & Olivier Cadot & Akiko Suwa-Eisenmann, 2009. "Do food scares explain supplier concentration ? An analysis of EU agri-food imports," PSE - G-MOND WORKING PAPERS halshs-00967423, HAL.
  9. Ana Cristina Molina, 2010. "Are Preferential Agreements Stepping Stones To Other Markets?," IHEID Working Papers 13-2010, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
  10. James E. Rauch & Joel Watson, 1999. "Starting Small in an Unfamiliar Environment," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1218, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  11. Jaud, Melise & Kukenova, Madina, 2011. "Financial development and survival of African agri-food exports," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5649, The World Bank.
  12. Tewari, Meenu, 1999. "Successful Adjustment in Indian Industry: the Case of Ludhiana's Woolen Knitwear Cluster," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1651-1671, September.
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