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Poverty Alleviation in Jordan : Lessons for the Future

Author

Listed:
  • Radwan A. Shaban
  • Dina Abu-Ghaida
  • Abdel-Salam Al-Naimat

Abstract

This report draws lessons for improving the policy design of poverty alleviation schemes in Jordan. The conclusions herein are based on analyses of trends in consumption poverty in Jordan and assessment of the impact of government programs (including food subsidies and cash transfers) on poverty alleviation in the 1990s. Poverty declined between 1992 and 1997 because inequality declined. Government programs, especially those targeted to the poor like the National Aid Fund, contributed to poverty alleviation. However, poverty continues to be a major policy challenge for Jordan: the poor and near-poor remain vulnerable as a result of the shallowness of poverty in Jordan (many people are concentrated close to the poverty line) and the adverse effects of potential shocks. The report concludes the following: 1) sustainable poverty reduction requires resumption and sustainability of growth; 2) there is a need for a policy response to the vulnerability of the poor and near-poor to economic shocks; 3) the capacity of the National Aid Fund (NAF) needs to be significantly enhanced; and 4) continued priority needs to be placed on human development policies, particularly those affecting the poor.

Suggested Citation

  • Radwan A. Shaban & Dina Abu-Ghaida & Abdel-Salam Al-Naimat, 2001. "Poverty Alleviation in Jordan : Lessons for the Future," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13906, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:13906
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/13906/225600REPLACEM1on02001100101PUBLIC1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ravallion, M., 1998. "Poverty Lines in Theory and Practice," Papers 133, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2003. "Poverty, Inequality and Growth in Selected Middle East and North Africa Countries, 1980-2000," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 2027-2048, December.
    2. Fareed M. A. Hassan & Djelloul Al-Saci, 2004. "Jordan : Supporting Stable Development in a Challenging Region, A Joint World Bank-Islamic Development Bank Evaluation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14946.
    3. Asfaw, Abay, 2008. "Fruits and vegetables availability for human consumption in Latin American and Caribbean countries: Patterns and determinants," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 444-454, October.
    4. Farrukh Iqbal, 2006. "Sustaining Gains in Poverty Reduction and Human Development in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7048.
    5. El-Said, Hamed & Harrigan, Jane, 2009. ""You Reap What You Plant": Social Networks in the Arab World--The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 1235-1249, July.
    6. Jane Harrigan & Hamed El-Said & Chengang Wang, 2006. "The IMF and the World Bank in Jordan: A case of over optimism and elusive growth," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 263-292, September.

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