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Sustaining Gains in Poverty Reduction and Human Development in the Middle East and North Africa

Author

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  • Farrukh Iqbal

Abstract

This book reviews the experience of the Middle East and North Africa region with poverty and human development since the mid-1980s. It finds that poverty rates did not decline by much during this period while health and education indicators improved substantially. The stagnation of poverty rates is ascribed to the stagnation of the region's economies during this period while the improvement in human indicators is likely due to several factors including improvement in the delivery of public health and education services.

Suggested Citation

  • Farrukh Iqbal, 2006. "Sustaining Gains in Poverty Reduction and Human Development in the Middle East and North Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7048, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7048
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Adams, Richard H., 2000. "Self-targeted subsidies - the distributional impact of the Egyptian food subsidy system," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2322, The World Bank.
    2. Adams, Richard H, Jr, 1991. "The Economic Uses and Impact of International Remittances in Rural Egypt," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(4), pages 695-722, July.
    3. L. ALAN WINTERS & NEIL McCULLOCH & ANDREW McKAY, 2015. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Non-Tariff Barriers, Regionalism and Poverty Essays in Applied International Trade Analysis, chapter 14, pages 271-314 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. David Robalino, 2005. "Pensions in the Middle East and North Africa: Time for Change," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7427.
    5. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 2004. "Returns to investment in education: a further update," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(2), pages 111-134.
    6. Radwan A. Shaban & Dina Abu-Ghaida & Abdel-Salam Al-Naimat, 2001. "Poverty Alleviation in Jordan : Lessons for the Future," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13906, April.
    7. Alderman, Harold & Lindert, Kathy, 1998. "The Potential and Limitations of Self-Targeted Food Subsidies," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 213-229, August.
    8. Gross, Alexandra & de Silva, Samantha, 2002. "Social fund support of microfinance : a review of implementation experience," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 25530, The World Bank.
    9. Subbarao, Kalanidhi, 2003. "Systemic shocks and social protection : role and effectiveness of public works programs," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 25606, The World Bank.
    10. Subbarao,Kalanidhi, 2003. "Systemic shocks and social protection : role and effectiveness of public works programs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 25606, The World Bank.
    11. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2004. "Gainers and losers from trade reform in Morocco," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3368, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Iqbal Farrukh & Kiendrebeogo Youssouf, 2015. "Public Spending and Education Attainment in the Middle East and North Africa," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 11(2), pages 99-118, August.
    2. Farrukh Iqbal & Youssouf Kiendrebeogo, "undated". "The Reduction of Child Mortality in the Middle East and North Africa: A Success Story," Economics Working Papers 20-06/2014, School of Business Administration, American University of Sharjah.
    3. Augusto Hernández Vidal, 2016. "El ciudadano cosmopolita: la globalización y el diseño de políticas educativas," DIVERGENCIA (ARTICULOS SOBRE ECONOMÍA), UNIVERSIDAD EXTERNADO DE COLOMBIA, February.
    4. World Bank, 2008. "Jordan - Resolving Jordan's Labor Market Paradox of Concurrent Economic Growth and High Unemployment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18907, The World Bank.
    5. Aurora Angeli & Marco Novelli, 2017. "Transitions in Late-Life Living Arrangements and Socio-economic Conditions of the Elderly in Egypt, Jordan and Tunisia," Working Papers 1083, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 2017.
    6. Facundo Alvaredo & Leonardo Gasparini, 2013. "Recent Trends in Inequality and Poverty in Developing Countries," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0151, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

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