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What Research Can Tell Policymakers about School Choice

Author

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  • Paul Teske

    (Political Science Department, SUNY Stony Brook)

  • Mark Schneider

    (Political Science Department, SUNY Stony Brook)

Abstract

American school systems have implemented several different kinds of school choice policies, and most of them are controversial. The research literature on various forms of school choice reveals some areas of consensus, but other areas where the results of studies diverge. Consensus results show that parents are more satisfied with choice, that they report using academic preferences to make choices, and that they tend to be more involved with their child's education as a consequence of choice. There is some, though mixed, evidence of improved test scores for children involved with various forms of choice. Actual parental use of choice and gathering of information, however, show some evidence of stratification, not always by race or income, but often by the level of parental involvement and motivation. These results provide considerable evidence about the effects on students whose parents have made an active choice, but more policy research is needed on the effects of competition on students in schools that have not been chosen. © 2001 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Teske & Mark Schneider, 2001. "What Research Can Tell Policymakers about School Choice," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 609-631.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:20:y:2001:i:4:p:609-631
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.1020
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.1020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borland, M V & Howsen, R M, 1996. "Competition, Expenditures and Student Performance in Mathematics: A Comment on Couch et al," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 87(3-4), pages 395-400, June.
    2. Couch, Jim F & Shughart, William F, II & Williams, Al L, 1993. "Private School Enrollment and Public School Performance," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 76(4), pages 301-312, August.
    3. William N. Evans & Robert M. Schwab, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-974.
    4. Thomas J. Nechyba, 2000. "Mobility, Targeting, and Private-School Vouchers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 130-146, March.
    5. Goldhaber, Dan D., 1996. "Public and private high schools: Is school choice an answer to the productivity problem?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 93-109, April.
    6. Epple, Dennis & Romano, Richard E, 1998. "Competition between Private and Public Schools, Vouchers, and Peer-Group Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 33-62, March.
    7. Buddin, Richard J. & Cordes, Joseph J. & Kirby, Sheila Nataraj, 1998. "School Choice in California: Who Chooses Private Schools?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 110-134, July.
    8. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 1994. "Do Private Schools Provide Competition for Public Schools?," NBER Working Papers 4978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bast, Joseph L. & Walberg, Herbert J., 2004. "Can parents choose the best schools for their children?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 431-440, August.
    2. Gary T. Henry & Craig S. Gordon, 2006. "Competition in the sandbox: A test of the effects of preschool competition on educational outcomes," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 97-127.
    3. Lai, Fang & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & de Janvry, Alain, 2009. "The adverse effects of parents' school selection errors on academic achievement: Evidence from the Beijing open enrollment program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 485-496, August.
    4. Stoddard, Christiana & Corcoran, Sean P., 2007. "The political economy of school choice: Support for charter schools across states and school districts," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 27-54, July.
    5. Ghazala Azmat & José Garcia Montalvo, 2012. "The role of awareness, information gathering and processing in school choice," Economics Working Papers 1324, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

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