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The finance‐growth nexus in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Panel cointegration and causality tests

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  • Babajide Fowowe

Abstract

This paper examines the causal relationship between financial development and economic growth using data for 17 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The analysis is conducted using panel cointegration and causality tests which take account of heterogeneity between countries which arises as a result of different country intercepts and varying regression coefficients slopes across countries. The results show that there is homogenous bi‐directional causality between financial development and economic growth. This result is robust to alternative measures of financial development and implies that for these Sub‐Saharan African countries, both the real and financial sectors are complementary to each other and their simultaneous development should be encouraged. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Babajide Fowowe, 2011. "The finance‐growth nexus in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Panel cointegration and causality tests," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(2), pages 220-239, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:23:y:2011:i:2:p:220-239
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1660
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    2. Elsa V. Artadi & Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 2003. "The Economic Tragedy of the XXth Century: Growth in Africa," NBER Working Papers 9865, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    4. Oriana Bandiera & Gerard Caprio & Patrick Honohan & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2000. "Does Financial Reform Raise or Reduce Saving?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(2), pages 239-263, May.
    5. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    6. Carmen M. Reinhart & Ioannis Tokatlidis, 2003. "Financial Liberalisation: The African Experience," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(Supplemen), pages 53-88, September.
    7. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    8. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    9. Beck, Thorsten & Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman, 2000. "Finance and the sources of growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1-2), pages 261-300.
    10. Demetriades, Panicos O & Luintel, Kul B, 1996. "Financial Development, Economic Growth and Banker Sector Controls: Evidence from India," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(435), pages 359-374, March.
    11. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Menyah, Kojo & Nazlioglu, Saban & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2014. "Financial development, trade openness and economic growth in African countries: New insights from a panel causality approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 386-394.
    2. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Loganathan, Nanthakumar & Kumar, Radika Devi, 2015. "Exploring the role of energy, trade and financial development in explaining economic growth in South Africa: A revisit," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1300-1311.
    3. Yabibal M. Walle, 2014. "Revisiting the Finance–Growth Nexus in Sub-Saharan Africa: Results from Error Correction-based Panel Cointegration Tests," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(2), pages 310-321, June.
    4. Inoue, Takeshi & Hamori, Shigeyuki, 2013. "Financial Permeation and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 53417, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. repec:agr:journl:v:1(614):y:2018:i:1(614):p:113-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Uslu, Çağrı Levent & Aydoğan, Ebru Tomris & Ketenci, Natalya, 2015. "Economic Growth, Financial Development, and Trade Openness in Emerging Markets: Panel Approach," MPRA Paper 64722, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. repec:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:44-56 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial development ; economic growth ; panel cointegration ; panel causality ; O16; O23; E44; G18; G28 ;

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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