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Health Consequences of Rural‐to‐Urban Migration: Evidence from Panel Data in China

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  • Yang Song
  • Wenkai Sun

Abstract

This paper provides new empirical evidence on the health consequences of rural‐to‐urban migration in China. We use a panel dataset from 2003 to 2006 constructed by the Research Center on the Rural Economy at the Ministry of Agriculture in China to investigate the effects of short‐term and medium‐term migration on health status. By combining propensity‐score matching and the difference‐in‐difference model, we attempt to overcome the migration endogeneity issue and estimate the average treatment effect on the treated. We find that the effect of short‐term migration on health in China is significantly positive mostly because of the income effect. However, the effect of longer‐term continuous migration on health is insignificant and close to zero. Our results are robust to several alternative estimation techniques and a series of robustness checks. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang Song & Wenkai Sun, 2016. "Health Consequences of Rural‐to‐Urban Migration: Evidence from Panel Data in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(10), pages 1252-1267, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:25:y:2016:i:10:p:1252-1267
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.3212
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    Cited by:

    1. Marta Bengoa & Christopher Rick, 2020. "Chinese Hukou Policy and Rural-to-Urban Migrants’ Health: Evidence from Matching Methods," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 46(2), pages 224-259, April.
    2. Chong Lu & Ailin Wu, 0. "The Household Registration Threshold and Peasant Worker Decision-Making over Acquiring Urban Hukou in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-26.
    3. Nolan, Anne & Layte, Richard, 2017. "The impact of transitions in insurance coverage on GP visiting among children in Ireland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 94-100.
    4. Fields, Gary & Song, Yang, 2020. "Modeling migration barriers in a two-sector framework: A welfare analysis of the hukou reform in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 293-301.
    5. Yuanyuan Ma & Anne Nolan, 2017. "Public Healthcare Entitlements and Healthcare Utilisation among the Older Population in Ireland," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(11), pages 1412-1428, November.
    6. Chong Lu & Ailin Wu, 2020. "The Household Registration Threshold and Peasant Worker Decision-Making over Acquiring Urban Hukou in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 151(3), pages 767-792, October.
    7. Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong, 2018. "Where are the migrants from? Inter- vs. intra-provincial rural-urban migration in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 142-155.
    8. Yaolin Liu & Enxiang Cai & Ying Jing & Jie Gong & Zhengyu Wang, 2018. "Analyzing the Decoupling between Rural-to-Urban Migrants and Urban Land Expansion in Hubei Province, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-15, January.

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