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Yang Song

Personal Details

First Name:Yang
Middle Name:
Last Name:Song
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pso341
86-18810560288

Affiliation

(95%) School of Economics
Renmin University of China

Beijing, China
http://econ.ruc.edu.cn/

: +86 10-62511102
+86 10-62511091
59 Zhongguancun Street, Beijing, 100872
RePEc:edi:seruccn (more details at EDIRC)

(4%) Department of Economics
Cornell University

Ithaca, New York (United States)
http://economics.cornell.edu/

: 607-255-4254
607-255-2818
Uris Hall, 4th Floor, Ithaca NY 14853
RePEc:edi:decorus (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) School of Labor and Human Resources
Renmin University of China

Beijing, China
http://slhr.ruc.edu.cn/

:


RePEc:edi:slruccn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Yang Song & Guangsu Zhou, 2017. "Inequality of opportunity and household education expenditures: Evidence from panel data in China," Working Papers 439, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  2. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  3. Fields, Gary S. & Song, Yang, 2013. "A Theoretical Model of the Chinese Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7278, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Articles

  1. Yang SONG, 2017. "Six central features of the Chinese labour market: A literature survey," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 156(2), pages 213-242, June.
  2. Yang Song, 2016. "Hukou-based labour market discrimination and ownership structure in urban China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 53(8), pages 1657-1673, June.
  3. Song, Yang & Yang, Jidong & Yang, Qijing, 2016. "Do firms' political connections depress the union wage effect? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 183-198.
  4. Yang Song & Wenkai Sun, 2016. "Health Consequences of Rural‐to‐Urban Migration: Evidence from Panel Data in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(10), pages 1252-1267, October.
  5. Guo, Qian & Song, Yang & Sun, Wenkai & Wang, Yijie, 2016. "Gender differences in performance-based pay: Evidence from a Chinese University," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 104-113.
  6. Song, Yang, 2014. "What should economists know about the current Chinese hukou system?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 200-212.
  7. Song, Yang, 2013. "Rising Chinese regional income inequality: The role of fiscal decentralization," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 294-309.
  8. Yang Song, 2012. "Poverty Reduction in China: The Contribution of Popularizing Primary Education," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 20(1), pages 105-122, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Fields, Gary S. & Song, Yang, 2013. "A Theoretical Model of the Chinese Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7278, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Song, Yang, 2014. "What should economists know about the current Chinese hukou system?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 200-212.
    2. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

Articles

  1. Yang SONG, 2017. "Six central features of the Chinese labour market: A literature survey," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 156(2), pages 213-242, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

  2. Yang Song, 2016. "Hukou-based labour market discrimination and ownership structure in urban China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 53(8), pages 1657-1673, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Ben Westmore, 2017. "Sharing the benefits of China’s growth by providing opportunities to all," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1409, OECD Publishing.
    2. Shengfu Yang & Shougeng Hu & Weidong Li & Chuanrong Zhang & José A. Torres, 2017. "Spatiotemporal Effects of Main Impact Factors on Residential Land Price in Major Cities of China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(11), pages 1-16, November.
    3. Vahan Sargsyan, 2015. "Differential Treatment in the Chinese Labor Market. Is Hukou Type the Only Problem?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp548, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.

  3. Song, Yang & Yang, Jidong & Yang, Qijing, 2016. "Do firms' political connections depress the union wage effect? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 183-198.

    Cited by:

    1. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

  4. Yang Song & Wenkai Sun, 2016. "Health Consequences of Rural‐to‐Urban Migration: Evidence from Panel Data in China," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(10), pages 1252-1267, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Nolan, Anne & Layte, Richard, 2017. "The impact of transitions in insurance coverage on GP visiting among children in Ireland," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 180(C), pages 94-100.
    2. Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong, 2017. "Where Are Migrants from? Inter- vs. Intra-Provincial Rural-Urban Migration in China," GLO Discussion Paper Series 120, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Yaolin Liu & Enxiang Cai & Ying Jing & Jie Gong & Zhengyu Wang, 2018. "Analyzing the Decoupling between Rural-to-Urban Migrants and Urban Land Expansion in Hubei Province, China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-15, January.

  5. Guo, Qian & Song, Yang & Sun, Wenkai & Wang, Yijie, 2016. "Gender differences in performance-based pay: Evidence from a Chinese University," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 104-113.

    Cited by:

    1. Ye, Bing & Zhao, Yucong, 2018. "Women hold up half the sky? Gender identity and the wife's labor market performance in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 116-141.

  6. Song, Yang, 2014. "What should economists know about the current Chinese hukou system?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 200-212.

    Cited by:

    1. Yang Song & Guangsu Zhou, 2017. "Inequality of opportunity and household education expenditures: Evidence from panel data in China," Working Papers 439, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Qi, Di & Wu, Yichao, 2016. "The extent and risk factors of child poverty in urban China — What can be done for realising the Chinese government goal of eradicating poverty before 2020," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 74-82.
    3. Anton Cheremukhin & Mikhail Golosov & Sergei Guriev & Aleh Tsyvinski, 2015. "The Economy of People’s Republic of China from 1953," NBER Working Papers 21397, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Chen, Jie & Zhou, Qian, 2017. "City size and urban labor productivity in China: New evidence from spatial city-level panel data analysis," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 165-178.
    5. Longjin Chen & Jian Huang & Jianjun Li, 2017. "Fiscal Decentralization, Satisfaction with Social Services, and Inequality Under the Hukou System," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 377-394, May.
    6. Pi, Jiancai & Zhang, Pengqing, 2016. "Hukou system reforms and skilled-unskilled wage inequality in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 90-103.
    7. Partridge, Mark D. & Yang, Benjian & Chen, Anping, 2017. "Do Border Effects Alter Regional Development: Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 82080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Ting Wang & Areendam Chanda, 2016. "Manufacturing Growth and Local Multipliers in China," Departmental Working Papers 2016-02, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    9. Fungáčová, Zuzana & Määttä, Ilari & Weill, Laurent, 2016. "What shapes social attitudes toward corruption in China? Micro-level evidence," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2016, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    10. He, Ming & Chen, Yang & van Marrewijk, Charles, 2017. "Urban Transformation and Technology Spillovers: Evidence from China's Electric Apparatus Sector," RIEI Working Papers 2017-01, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Research Institute for Economic Integration.
    11. Di Qi & Yichao Wu, 2016. "Child Income Poverty Levels and Trends in Urban China from 1989 to 2011," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 9(4), pages 1043-1058, December.
    12. Vahan Sargsyan, 2015. "Differential Treatment in the Chinese Labor Market. Is Hukou Type the Only Problem?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp548, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.

  7. Song, Yang, 2013. "Rising Chinese regional income inequality: The role of fiscal decentralization," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 294-309.

    Cited by:

    1. Yang Song & Guangsu Zhou, 2017. "Inequality of opportunity and household education expenditures: Evidence from panel data in China," Working Papers 439, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    2. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2015. "The Regional Effects of Macroeconomic Shocks in China," ERSA conference papers ersa15p17, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Ma, Xinxin, 2018. "Labor market segmentation by industry sectors and wage gaps between migrants and local urban residents in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 96-115.
    4. Antonio N. Bojanic, 2018. "The Impact of Fiscal Decentralization on Accountability, Economic Freedom, and Political and Civil Liberties in the Americas," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-20, February.
    5. Song, Yang & Yang, Jidong & Yang, Qijing, 2016. "Do firms' political connections depress the union wage effect? Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 183-198.
    6. Yongzheng Liu & Jorge Martinez-Vazquez & Alfred M. Wu, 2017. "Fiscal decentralization, equalization, and intra-provincial inequality in China," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 24(2), pages 248-281, April.
    7. Li, Bin & Li, Tuo & Yu, Man & Chen, Bin, 2017. "Can equalization of public services narrow the regional disparities in China? A spatial econometrics approach," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 67-78.
    8. Zhu, Rong, 2016. "Wage differentials between urban residents and rural migrants in urban China during 2002–2007: A distributional analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 2-14.
    9. Antonio N. Bojanic, 2016. "The Impact of Fiscal Decentralization on Growth, Inflation, and Inequality in the Americas," Working Papers 1610, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    10. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    11. Antonio N. Bojanic, 2016. "Fiscal Decentralization, Economic Freedom, and Political and Civil Liberties in the Americas," Working Papers 1609, Tulane University, Department of Economics.

  8. Yang Song, 2012. "Poverty Reduction in China: The Contribution of Popularizing Primary Education," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 20(1), pages 105-122, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Song, Yang, 2014. "What should economists know about the current Chinese hukou system?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 200-212.
    2. La, Vincent, 2014. "Does Schooling Pay? Evidence from China," MPRA Paper 54578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Jing You & Sangui Wang & Laurence Roope, 2014. "Multi-dimensional Intertemporal Poverty in Rural China," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-36, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    4. Song, Yang, 2013. "Rising Chinese regional income inequality: The role of fiscal decentralization," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 294-309.
    5. Fields, Gary S. & Song, Yang, 2013. "A Theoretical Model of the Chinese Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7278, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Jing You & Sangui Wang & Laurence Roope, 2018. "Intertemporal deprivation in rural china: income and nutrition," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 16(1), pages 61-101, March.
    7. Hai Fang & Karen N. Eggleston & John A. Rizzo & Scott Rozelle & Richard J. Zeckhauser, 2012. "The Returns to Education in China: Evidence from the 1986 Compulsory Education Law," NBER Working Papers 18189, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. Castro Campos, Bente & Ren, Yanjun & Petrick, Martin, 2016. "The impact of education on income inequality between ethnic minorities and Han in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 253-267.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (3) 2013-03-23 2016-11-27 2017-07-23. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CNA: China (2) 2016-11-27 2017-07-23. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EDU: Education (2) 2016-11-27 2017-07-23. Author is listed
  4. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2017-07-23. Author is listed
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2013-03-23. Author is listed
  6. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2013-03-23. Author is listed

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