IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v18y2009i7p743-759.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The influence of economic incentives on reported disability status

Author

Listed:
  • Brenda Gannon

Abstract

Self‐reported disability status is often relied upon in labour force participation models, but this may be reported with error for economic or psychological reasons and can lead to a bias in the effect of disability on participation. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reported limitations in daily activities are mis‐reported, in particular for those who define their labour force status as disabled/ill, and assess if economic incentives influence this group to mis‐report. The main questions we wish to address therefore are: (1) was there state‐dependent reporting error and did economic incentives play a role, and (2) did this change over the years 1995–2001? Using a generalised ordered response model, we compute cleansed measures of disability that correspond to predicted responses individuals would have made if employed. Unobserved differences between the employed and non‐employed may exist; therefore, we control for this via correlated random effects. The results indicate that the disabled/ill group did over‐report and the difference between actual and predicted probabilities only marginally changed between 1995 and 2001. The extent of this measurement error is lower once we control for unobserved heterogeneity. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Brenda Gannon, 2009. "The influence of economic incentives on reported disability status," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(7), pages 743-759, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:7:p:743-759
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1399
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/hec.1399
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1002/hec.1399?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.
    2. Stefan Boes & Rainer Winkelmann, 2006. "The Effect of Income on Positive and Negative Subjective Well-Being," SOI - Working Papers 0605, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
    3. Brent Kreider, 1999. "Latent Work Disability and Reporting Bias," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(4), pages 734-769.
    4. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
    5. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
    6. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
    7. Cedric Tille & Kei-Mu Yi, 2001. "Curbing unemployment in Europe: are there lessons from Ireland and the Netherlands?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 7(May).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. John Cullinan & Brenda Gannon & Eamon O’Shea, 2013. "The welfare implications of disability for older people in Ireland," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(2), pages 171-183, April.
    2. Brenda Gannon & Bérengère Davin, 2010. "Use of formal and informal care services among older people in Ireland and France," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(5), pages 499-511, October.
    3. Thomas Barnay, 2016. "Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(6), pages 693-709, July.
    4. Thomas Barnay & Éric Defebvre, 2019. "Gender Differences in the Influence of Mental Health on Job Retention," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 33(4), pages 507-532, December.
    5. Thomas Barnay & Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche & Mathieu Narcy & Yann Videau, 2014. "L’impact du handicap sur les trajectoires d’emploi : une comparaison public-privé," Erudite Working Paper 2014-05, Erudite.
    6. William H Greene & Mark N Harris & Preety Srivastava & Xueyan Zhao, 2013. "Econometric Modelling of Social Bads," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1305, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    7. Black, Nicole & Johnston, David W. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2017. "Justification bias in self-reported disability: New evidence from panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-134.
    8. Gannon, Brenda, 2006. "Disability Benefit - Controlled or Under-Controlled?," Papers BP2007/1, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Bauer, Ann Barbara & Eichenberger, Reiner, 2021. "Worsening workers' health by lowering retirement age: The malign consequences of a benign reform," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 18(C).
    10. Andrew M. Jones & Stefanie Schurer, 2011. "How does heterogeneity shape the socioeconomic gradient in health satisfaction?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 549-579, June.
    11. Zantomio, Francesca, 2013. "Older people's participation in extra-cost disability benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 320-330.
    12. Sarah Brown & Mark N Harris & Preety Srivastava, 2013. "Modelling Illegal Drug Participation in Australia," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1303, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    13. Burcu Düzgün Öncel & Deniz Karaoğlan, 2016. "Disability and Labor Force Participation: Evidence from Turkish Males," ERC Working Papers 1608, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Aug 2016.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Sarah Brown & Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2010. "Reservation wages, labour market participation and health," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 173(3), pages 501-529, July.
    2. Maite Blázquez Cuesta & Elena Cottini & Herrarte, A. (Ainhoa), 2012. "GINI DP 39: Socioeconomic Gradient in Health: How Important is Material Deprivation?," GINI Discussion Papers 39, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    3. Beni­tez-Silva, Hugo & Ni, Huan, 2008. "Health status and health dynamics in an empirical model of expected longevity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 564-584, May.
    4. William H. Greene & David A. Hensher, 2008. "Modeling Ordered Choices: A Primer and Recent Developments," Working Papers 08-26, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    5. Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel & Roberts, Jennifer, 2010. "Sick of work or too sick to work? Evidence on self-reported health shocks and early retirement from the BHPS," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 866-880, July.
    6. Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2009. "Ill-health as a household norm: Evidence from other people's health problems," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 251-259, January.
    7. Maite Blázquez & Elena Cottini & Ainhoa Herrarte, 2014. "The socioeconomic gradient in health: how important is material deprivation?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 239-264, June.
    8. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2008. "Persistence in health limitations: A European comparative analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1472-1488, December.
    9. Umut Oguzoglu, 2010. "Dynamics of work limitation and work in Australia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 656-669, June.
    10. Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2015. "Health status and the allocation of time: Cross-country evidence from Europe," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 188-203.
    11. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Nicolai Kristensen, 2008. "Work environment satisfaction and employee health: panel evidence from Denmark, France and Spain, 1994–2001," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 9(1), pages 51-61, February.
    12. Au, N. & Johnston, D. W., 2013. "An econometric analysis of self-assessed health: what does it mean and what is it hiding?," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 13/31, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2009. "Comparing subjective and objective measures of health: Evidence from hypertension for the income/health gradient," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 540-552, May.
    14. Gannon, Brenda, 2006. "Disability Benefit - Controlled or Under-Controlled?," Papers BP2007/1, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    15. repec:esr:chaptr:jacb200665 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Nigel Rice & Jennifer Roberts & Andrew M. Jones, 2006. "Sick of work or too sick to work? Evidence on health shocks and early retirement from the BHPS," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 06/13, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    17. Rafael Sánchez, 2017. "Does a Mandatory Reduction of Standard Working Hours Improve Employees' Health Status?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-39, January.
    18. Aranki, Ted & Macchiarelli, Corrado, 2013. "Employment duration and shifts into retirement in the EU," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 53190, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    19. Harris, M.N. & Zhao, X. & Zucchelli, E., 2016. "The dynamics of health and labour market transitions at older ages: evidence from a multi-state model," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/30, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    20. William H. Greene & Mark N. Harris & Bruce Hollingsworth, 2015. "Inflated Responses in Measures of Self-Assessed Health," American Journal of Health Economics, MIT Press, vol. 1(4), pages 461-493, Fall.
    21. Brown, Sarah & Harris, Mark N. & Srivastava, Preety & Taylor, Karl, 2018. "Mental Health and Reporting Bias: Analysis of the GHQ-12," IZA Discussion Papers 11771, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:7:p:743-759. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Wiley Content Delivery (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.