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Employment duration and shifts into retirement in the EU

Author

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  • Aranki, Ted
  • Macchiarelli, Corrado

Abstract

According to Principal-Agent theory, states (the principal) delegate the implementation of a legalized agreement to an international organization (the agent). The conventional wisdom about states’ capacity to control international organizations is that differences among the member states impede control and consequently enhance the agent’s autonomy, whereas agreement allows for effective control and limited autonomy. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, this article argues that conflicts among states need not impede effective control. On the contrary: it harbors gains from the exchange of informal control over an organization’s divisions. As a result, international organizations exhibit informal spheres of influence, or national chiefdoms. The article demonstrated the theory’s plausibility using the example of the EU. It has implications for the literature on delegation and informal governance.

Suggested Citation

  • Aranki, Ted & Macchiarelli, Corrado, 2013. "Employment duration and shifts into retirement in the EU," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 53190, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:53190
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/53190/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Melanie Ward-Warmedinger & Corrado Macchiarelli, 2013. "Transitions in labour market status in the European Union," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 69, European Institute, LSE.
    2. Nicolas Sirven & Thomas Barnay, 2017. "Expectations, loss aversion and retirement decisions in the context of the 2009 crisis in Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(1), pages 25-44, April.
    3. Melanie Ward-Warmedinger & Corrado Macchiarelli, 2014. "Transitions in labour market status in EU labour markets," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-25, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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