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Social determinants of health: an economic perspective

Author

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  • David Epstein

    (University of York, York, UK)

  • Dolores Jiménez-Rubio

    (University of Granada, Granada, Spain)

  • Peter C. Smith

    (University of York, York, UK)

  • Marc Suhrcke

    (University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK)

Abstract

The World Health Organization has recently received the findings of its Commission on the Social Determinants of Health. The Commission's report offers a remarkable summary of the evidence, and makes a passionate case for government action to address the social determinants of health, especially as they relate to health inequity. This paper summarizes the ways in which economic analysis could strengthen policy under three headings: examining the causal impact of the determinants of health and of associated policies; prioritising actions; and determining the role of government in influencing behaviour. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • David Epstein & Dolores Jiménez-Rubio & Peter C. Smith & Marc Suhrcke, 2009. "Social determinants of health: an economic perspective," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(5), pages 495-502.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:5:p:495-502
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1490
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1490
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bridget O'Laughlin & Bridget O'Laughlin, 2016. "Forum 2016," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 47(4), pages 686-711, July.
    2. Costa Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & McGuire, Alistair, 2011. "Persistence despite action? Measuring the patterns of health inequality in England (1997–2007)," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 149-159.
    3. Sandy Tubeuf & Florence Jusot, 2011. "Social health inequalities among older Europeans: the contribution of social and family background," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(1), pages 61-77, February.
    4. Morton, Alec, 2014. "Aversion to health inequalities in healthcare prioritisation: A multicriteria optimisation perspective," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 164-173.
    5. Pega, Frank & Valentine, Nicole B. & Matheson, Don & Rasanathan, Kumanan, 2014. "Public social monitoring reports and their effect on a policy programme aimed at addressing the social determinants of health to improve health equity in New Zealand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 61-69.

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