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Pollution and Growth: The Role of Pension on the Efficiency of Health and Environmental Policies

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Abstract

This paper analyses the effect of a pay-as-you-go pension system on the evolution of capital and pollution, and on the efficiency of an environmental versus health policy. In an overlapping generations model (OLG), we introduce endogenous longevity that depends on pollution and health expenditures. Global dynamics may display multiple balanced growth paths (BGP). We show that by discouraging savings, a policy that promotes the pension system enlarges the environmental poverty trap. More surprisingly, the environmental policy has contrasted effects according to the significance of the pension system. If it has a low size, a raise of the environmental policy enlarges the environmental poverty trap and leads to a rise in capital over pollution at the highest stationary equilibrium. In contrast, in economies where intergenerational solidarity is well developed, capital over pollution decreases at the highest BGP. In such a case, the environmental policy does not necessarily lead to a better longevity and growth.

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  • Armel Ngami & Thomas Seegmuller, 2018. "Pollution and Growth: The Role of Pension on the Efficiency of Health and Environmental Policies," AMSE Working Papers 1815, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
  • Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1815
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    Keywords

    longevity; environment; Health; pension system; growth; Pollution;

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