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Innovation in the food industry

  • W. Bruce Traill

    (Department of Agricultural and Food Economics, The University of Reading, P.O. Box 237, Reading RG6 6AR United Kingdom)

  • Matthew Meulenberg

    (Marketing and Consumer Behaviour Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands)

Twelve food-manufacturing companies in six European countries have been studied with respect to the way in which they innovate, their motivations, and their emphasis on product or process innovation. It is suggested that the traditional “demand-pull” versus “technology-push” versus “a mixture of both” debate is too simplistic. Firms behave differently depending on their dominant “orientations” towards the product, the process, or the market, the types of market they supply (particularly whether they supply branded or private-label products), the nature of their ownership (public, private, co-operative), market size and scope, and company size. The suggestions of the case studies are, in general, supported by quantitative results from a survey of food manufacturers, though the survey was not designed specifically for this purpose and further quantitative model development is proposed. The findings reported in this article and the proposed refinements are important to firms and policy-makers concerned with the efficiency and effectiveness of food industry innovation [JEL Classification Codes: L100, L200, L660] © 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/agr.10002
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Agribusiness.

Volume (Year): 18 (2001)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1-21

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Handle: RePEc:wly:agribz:v:18:y:2001:i:1:p:1-21
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-6297

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  1. Claudia Roder & Roland Herrmann & John Connor, 2000. "Determinants of new product introductions in the US food industry: a panel-model approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(11), pages 743-748.
  2. Paul Krugman, 1995. "Growing World Trade: Causes and Consequences," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 327-377.
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