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Urban Industrial Composition and the Spatial Expansion of Cities

  • Perry Burnett
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    This paper uses a computable general equilibrium model with integrated commercial and residential land data to estimate the impact of urban growth, both in sector origin and growth mechanism, on urban spatial expansion, measured by density (population, employment, and commercial), residential lot size, and urban land conversion. The results demonstrate that specific sectors and individual growth mechanisms have unique impacts across the spatial expansion measures in both sign and magnitude; therefore, local policy makers should carefully consider the uniqueness of their city in terms of their geographic surroundings and mixture of urban growth before implementing or emulating other cities’ policies.

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    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/88/4/764
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    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

    Volume (Year): 88 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 764-781

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:iv:1:p:764-781
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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    1. Sukkoo Kim, 2000. "Urban Development in the United States, 1690–1990," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 66(4), pages 855-880, April.
    2. Rappaport, Jordan & Kahn, Matthew E. & Glaeser, Edward, 2008. "Why Do The Poor Live In Cities? The Role of Public Transportation," Scholarly Articles 2958224, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Blackley, Dixie M, 1999. "The Long-Run Elasticity of New Housing Supply in the United States: Empirical Evidence for 1950 to 1994," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 25-42, January.
    4. Engle, Robert F., 1979. "Estimation of the price elasticity of demand facing metropolitan producers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 42-64, January.
    5. Brown, Scott J. & Coulson, N. Edward & Engle, Robert F., 1992. "On the determination of regional base and regional base multipliers," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 619-635, November.
    6. Richard K. Green & Stephen Malpezzi & Stephen K. Mayo, 1999. "Metropolitan-Specific Estimates of the Price Elasticity of Supply of Housing, and Their Sources," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 99-16, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    7. Perry Burnett & Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies, 2012. "Understanding The Unique Impacts Of Economic Growth Variables," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 451-468, 08.
    8. Jan K. Brueckner, 2000. "Urban Sprawl: Diagnosis and Remedies," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 23(2), pages 160-171, April.
    9. William B. Beyers, 2005. "Services and the changing economic base of regions in the united states," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(4), pages 461-476, June.
    10. Ian Hardie & Peter Parks & Peter Gottleib & David Wear, 2000. "Responsiveness of Rural and Urban Land Uses to Land Rent Determinants in the U.S. South," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(4), pages 659-673.
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