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The Impact Of Specific-Sector Changes In Employment On Economic Growth, Labor Market Performance And Migration

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  • Harvey Cutler
  • Stephen Davies

Abstract

It is common in empirical regional economics to use total employment as an explanatory variable while investigating issues such as the level and distribution of income and migration. This paper argues that sector-specific changes in employment and labor market performance can have different effects on economic growth, the collection of tax revenue, migration, and the level and distribution of household income. As such, it is important to model sectors separately. We find that expansions in employment opportunities for a high-wage sector such as computer manufacturing or bioengineering, a medium-wage sector manufacturing, and the lower-wage sector of retailing have differing economic consequences for a small city. We use a data intensive computable general equilibrium model to obtain these results. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2007

Suggested Citation

  • Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies, 2007. "The Impact Of Specific-Sector Changes In Employment On Economic Growth, Labor Market Performance And Migration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(5), pages 935-963.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:47:y:2007:i:5:p:935-963
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gwilym Pryce, 1999. "Construction Elasticities and Land Availability: A Two-stage Least-squares Model of Housing Supply Using the Variable Elasticity Approach," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(13), pages 2283-2304, December.
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    5. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "The waxing and waning of regional economies: the chicken-egg question of jobs versus people," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 76-97, January.
    6. Malpezzi, Stephen & Maclennan, Duncan, 2001. "The Long-Run Price Elasticity of Supply of New Residential Construction in the United States and the United Kingdom," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 278-306, September.
    7. Greenwood, Michael J & Hunt, Gary L, 1984. "Migration and Interregional Employment Redistribution in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(5), pages 957-969, December.
    8. Vijay K. Mathur & Frank M. Song, 2000. "A labor market based theory of regional economic development," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 34(1), pages 131-145.
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    Cited by:

    1. Perry Burnett & Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies, 2012. "Understanding The Unique Impacts Of Economic Growth Variables," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 451-468, August.
    2. Konan, Denise Eby, 2011. "Limits to growth: Tourism and regional labor migration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 473-481, January.
    3. Hess, Joshua & Manning, Dale & Iverson, Terry & Cutler, Harvey, 2016. "Uncertainty, Learning, and Local Opposition to Hydraulic Fracturing," MPRA Paper 79238, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Perry Burnett, 2012. "Urban Industrial Composition and the Spatial Expansion of Cities," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(4), pages 764-781.
    5. Giesecke, James A. & Madden, John R., 2013. "Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    6. Jens Abildtrup & Virginie Piguet & Bertrand Schmitt, 2011. "The impact of agro-food industry on employment and population changes: The case of Denmark and France'," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1622, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 2012. "Integrating Regional Economic Development Analysis and Land Use Economics," Economics Working Paper Series 1203, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    8. Katherine Chalmers & Stephan Weiler, 2011. "Sorting winners and losers: using CGE models to assess income distribution effects of economic development choices," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15, March.

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