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Sources of fluctuations in regional growth

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  • Donald G. Freeman

    () (Department of Economics and International Business, Sam Houston State University, P.O. Box 2118 Huntsville, TX 77341-2118, USA)

Abstract

This paper re-examines the role of employment and population growth in regional development. Previous studies have found evidence for both the "chicken and the egg": both demand-side employment shocks and supply-side population shocks have been found to influence regional growth. Using recent developments in causality testing for pooled samples, this study also finds evidence of bivariate causality, but support for the "people follow jobs" approach to regional development is marked by results that are more consistent and more often statistically significant. Impulse response functions also sustain this point.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald G. Freeman, 2001. "Sources of fluctuations in regional growth," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 35(2), pages 249-266.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:35:y:2001:i:2:p:249-266
    Note: Received: May 1999/Accepted: April 2000
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod, 2007. "Determinants of population and jobs at a local level," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 41(1), pages 87-104, March.
    2. Perry Burnett & Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies, 2012. "Understanding The Unique Impacts Of Economic Growth Variables," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 451-468, August.
    3. Tervo, Hannu, 2016. "Do People Follow Jobs or Do Jobs Follow People? The Case of Finland in an International Context," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 46(1).
    4. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 2003. "The waxing and waning of regional economies: the chicken-egg question of jobs versus people," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 76-97, January.
    5. M.Carmen Guisan & M.Teresa Cancelo, 2004. "Wages, Employment and Productivity in EU and USA," ERSA conference papers ersa04p460, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Wouter Vermeulen & Jos Van Ommeren, 2004. "Interaction of Regional Population and Employment over Time: identifying short-run effects and equilibrium adjustment," ERSA conference papers ersa04p256, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies, 2007. "The Impact Of Specific‐Sector Changes In Employment On Economic Growth, Labor Market Performance And Migration," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(5), pages 935-963, December.
    8. Shu‐Hen Chiang, 2012. "The Source of Metropolitan Growth: The Role of Commuting," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 143-166, March.
    9. Wouter Vermeulen & Jos van Ommeren, 2004. "Interaction of Regional Population and Employment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-083/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Shu-hen Chiang, 2018. "Assessing the Merits of the Urban-Led Policy in China: Spread or Backwash Effect?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(2), pages 1-14, February.
    11. Guisan, C, 2005. "Universities and Research Expenditure in Europe and the USA, 1993-2003: An Analysis of Countries and Regions," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(2), pages 35-46.
    12. Josep-Maria Arauzo-Carod & Daniel Liviano-Solís, 2012. "Migration Determinants at a Local Level," ERSA conference papers ersa12p500, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Shu-Hen Chiang, 2014. "The dilemma of "Twin Cities": is the suburban dependence hypothesis applicable?," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 149-163, June.
    14. Zisiadou, Argyro & Metaxas, Theodore, 2014. "The Mediterranean countries of European Union and their progress from 1980 to 2012: A comparative analysis," MPRA Paper 55029, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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