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A Spatial Econometric Analysis of Land Use Efficiency in Large and Small Municipalities

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  • Gianni Guastella

    (Università Cattolica and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Stefano Pareglio

    (Università Cattolica and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei)

  • Paolo Sckokai

    (Università Cattolica)

Abstract

We estimate the relationship between urban spatial expansion and its socio-economic determinants in Lombardy, the most urbanised region of Italy (and one of the most urbanized of the European Union), at the municipality level. Test results suggest that this relationship varies significantly among municipalities of different size and findings support the hypothesis that larger ones are more efficient in managing land take. In particular, we find that the marginal land consumption per new household is inversely related to the size of the municipality and we link this evidence to the fact that, since more space is often available, small municipalities pay less institutional attention to the issue of land take and consequently internalise less the environmental externalities. This evidence calls for a reflection on the role of planning policies and the effectiveness of undifferentiated measures to contain land take, especially in the case of Italy, where the municipalities, more than 99% of which have less than 50,000 inhabitants, decide on land use transformations.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianni Guastella & Stefano Pareglio & Paolo Sckokai, 2017. "A Spatial Econometric Analysis of Land Use Efficiency in Large and Small Municipalities," Working Papers 2017.03, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2017.03
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Land Take; City Size; Threshold Regression; Spatial Econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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