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Military Service and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from Colonial Punjab

Listed author(s):
  • Oliver Vanden Eynde

This paper estimates the impact of military recruitment during World War I on human capital accumulation in colonial Punjab. The empirical strategy exploits the exogenous increase in recruitment by the Indian Army during the war. Higher military recruitment is found to be associated with increased literacy at the district-religion level. The observed improvement in the human capital stock appears to be driven by the informal acquisition of literacy skills by serving soldiers.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/51/4/1003
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 51 (2016)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 10031035-10031035

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:51:y:2016:i:4:p:10031035
Note: DOI: 10.3368/jhr.51.4.1013-5977R1
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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  36. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/10262 is not listed on IDEAS
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