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A Growth Rate for a Sustainable Economy

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  • Alessio Emanuele BIONDO

Abstract

A sustainable growth rate – i.e. a growth rate which allows economy to expand without compromising the equilibrium of the natural system – is one of the most important and stimulating topics in growth literature. In this paper two findings will be presented. First of all, a brief discussion of both concepts – growth and development – is presented. A new sight for their relationship is suggested. The usual distinction between quantitative and qualitative variables is shown to be unsatisfactory. Growth and development must fit in a sustainability framework and therefore, progress should be based on steps of sustainable economic growth in order to have higher development levels. Secondly, a two-sector-closed-economy model is presented to demonstrate the existence of a positive sustainable growth rate for the GDP.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessio Emanuele BIONDO, 2010. "A Growth Rate for a Sustainable Economy," Journal of Applied Economic Sciences, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Financial Management and Accounting Craiova, vol. 5(2(12)/Sum), pages 7-20.
  • Handle: RePEc:ush:jaessh:v:5:y:2010:i:2(12)_spring2010:p:97
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; sustainable growth; development; sustainability;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O49 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Other
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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