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Double CO2 and beyond: benefits, costs and compensation

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  • Spash, Clive L.

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  • Spash, Clive L., 1994. "Double CO2 and beyond: benefits, costs and compensation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 27-36, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:10:y:1994:i:1:p:27-36
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nordhaus, William D., 1993. "Rolling the 'DICE': an optimal transition path for controlling greenhouse gases," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 27-50, March.
    2. Baker, Kimberly Anne & Fennessy, M. Siobhan & Mitsch, William J., 1991. "Designing wetlands for controlling coal mine drainage: an ecologic-economic modelling approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, March.
    3. Cleveland, Cutler J., 1993. "An exploration of alternative measures of natural resource scarcity: the case of petroleum resources in the U.S," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 123-157, April.
    4. Kaufmann, Robert K., 1992. "A biophysical analysis of the energy/real GDP ratio: implications for substitution and technical change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 35-56, July.
    5. Tahvonen, Olli & Kuuluvainen, Jari, 1991. "Optimal growth with renewable resources and pollution," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(2-3), pages 650-661, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Spash, Clive L., 2009. "The Brave New World of Carbon Trading," MPRA Paper 19114, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Spash, Clive L., 2007. "The economics of climate change impacts a la Stern: Novel and nuanced or rhetorically restricted?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 706-713, September.
    3. Helen Scarborough & Jeff Bennett, 2012. "Cost–Benefit Analysis and Distributional Preferences," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14376, April.
    4. Davidson, Marc D., 2014. "Zero discounting can compensate future generations for climate damage," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 40-47.
    5. Padilla, Emilio, 2002. "Intergenerational equity and sustainability," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 69-83, April.
    6. Stern, David I., 1997. "Limits to substitution and irreversibility in production and consumption: A neoclassical interpretation of ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 197-215, June.
    7. Spash, Clive L. & Villena, Mauricio G., 1999. "Exploring the Approach of Institutional Economics to the Environment," MPRA Paper 17278, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Alessio Emanuele BIONDO, 2010. "A Growth Rate for a Sustainable Economy," Journal of Applied Economic Sciences, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Financial Management and Accounting Craiova, vol. 5(2(12)/Sum), pages 7-20.
    9. Azar, Christian & Sterner, Thomas, 1996. "Discounting and distributional considerations in the context of global warming," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 169-184, November.
    10. Azar, Christian & Holmberg, John, 1995. "Defining the generational environmental debt," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 7-19, July.
    11. Clive L. Spash & Clemens Gattringer, 2016. "The Economics and Ethics of Human Induced Climate Change," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2016_02, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    12. Christian Azar, 1999. "Weight Factors in Cost-Benefit Analysis of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 13(3), pages 249-268, April.
    13. Rennings, Klaus & Koschel, Henrike, 1995. "Externe Kosten der Energieversorgung und ihre Bedeutung im Konzept einer dauerhaft-umweltgerechten Entwicklung," ZEW Dokumentationen 95-06, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    14. Gerlagh, Reyer & van der Zwaan, B. C. C., 2002. "Long-Term Substitutability between Environmental and Man-Made Goods," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 329-345, September.
    15. Fearnside, Philip M., 2002. "Time preference in global warming calculations: a proposal for a unified index," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 21-31, April.
    16. John Gowdy & Roxana Juliá, 2010. "Global Warming Economics in the Long Run: A Conceptual Framework," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 86(1), pages 117-130.
    17. Christian Azar, 1998. "Are Optimal CO 2 Emissions Really Optimal?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(3), pages 301-315, April.
    18. Gerlagh, Reyer & Keyzer, Michiel A., 2003. "Efficiency of conservationist measures: an optimist viewpoint," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 310-333, September.
    19. Aalbers, R.F.T., 1999. "On the implications of thresholds for economic science and environmental policy," Other publications TiSEM 1b70587b-5494-4f87-bf3a-7, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

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