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An Evaluation of Interpol's Cooperative-Based Counterterrorism Linkages

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  • Todd Sandler
  • Daniel G. Arce
  • Walter Enders

Abstract

This paper evaluates the payback from efforts of the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) to coordinate proactive counterterrorism measures by its member countries to arrest terrorists and weaken their ability to conduct operations. We use Interpol arrest data and data on utilization of Interpol resources by member countries to compute counterfactual benefit measurements, which, when matched with costs, yield benefit-cost ratios. The average of these ratios is approximately 200 over 12 alternative counterfactual scenarios, so each dollar of Interpol counterterrorism spending returns approximately $200. This paper also puts forward a perspective on benefits derived from Interpol's Stolen and Lost Travel Document database. Interpol provides an inexpensive proactive measure against transnational terrorism that, unlike military operations, does not result in backlash attacks.

Suggested Citation

  • Todd Sandler & Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders, 2011. "An Evaluation of Interpol's Cooperative-Based Counterterrorism Linkages," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(1), pages 79-110.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:doi:10.1086/652422
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sandler, Todd & Enders, Walter, 2004. "An economic perspective on transnational terrorism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 301-316, June.
    2. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Todd Sandler, 2011. "The Interplay Between Preemptive and Defensive Counterterrorism Measures: A Two‐stage Game," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, pages 546-564.
    3. Todd Sandler & Kevin Siqueira, 2006. "Global terrorism: deterrence versus pre-emption," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1370-1387, November.
    4. Sandler, Todd & Lapan, Harvey E., 1988. "The Calculus of Dissent: An Analysis of Terrorists' Choice of Targets," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10818, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. B. Peter Rosendorff & Todd Sandler, 2004. "Too Much of a Good Thing?," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 48(5), pages 657-671, October.
    6. Todd Sandler, 2005. "Collective versus unilateral responses to terrorism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 75-93, July.
    7. Siqueira, Kevin & Sandler, Todd, 2007. "Terrorist backlash, terrorism mitigation, and policy delegation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(9), pages 1800-1815, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Gassebner & Simon Luechinger, 2011. "Lock, stock, and barrel: a comprehensive assessment of the determinants of terror," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 235-261, December.
    2. Walter Enders & Todd Sandler, 2011. "Who adopts MIND/FIND in INTERPOL’s fight against international crime and terrorism?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 263-280, December.
    3. Todd Sandler, 2011. "The many faces of counterterrorism: an introduction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 225-234, December.
    4. Malcolm Kass & Enrique Fatas & Catherine Eckel & Daniel Arce, 2015. "The UN in the lab," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 45(3), pages 625-651, October.
    5. Asif Efrat, 2015. "Do human rights violations hinder counterterrorism cooperation? Evidence from the FBI’s deployment abroad," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 329-349, September.
    6. Paschalis Arvanitidis & Athina Economou & Christos Kollias, 2016. "Terrorism’s effects on social capital in European countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 169(3), pages 231-250, December.
    7. Javier Gardeazabal & Todd Sandler, 2015. "INTERPOL's Surveillance Network in Curbing Transnational Terrorism," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(4), pages 761-780, September.
    8. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:57-73 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Eric van Um & Daniela Pisoiu, 2011. "Counterterrorism - Does It Work?," EUSECON Policy Briefing 13, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. repec:spr:dyngam:v:7:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s13235-016-0188-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Eric van Um & Daniela Pisoiu, 2011. "Effective Counterterrorism: What Have We Learned so Far?," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 55, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Halkos, George & Zisiadou, Argyro, 2016. "Exploring the effect of terrorist attacks on markets," MPRA Paper 71877, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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