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Immigration, Search, and Loss of Skill

Author

Listed:
  • Yoram Weiss

    (Tel Aviv University)

  • Robert M. Sauer

    (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

  • Menachem Gotlibovski

    (Academic College of Tel-Aviv-Yaffo)

Abstract

This article develops and estimates an on-the-job search model of the entry of highly skilled immigrants from the former Soviet Union into the Israeli labor market. The estimated parameters of the model, together with information on the wages of immigrants from earlier waves, imply that, on average, immigrants can expect lifetime earnings to fall short of the lifetime earnings of comparable natives by 57%. Of this figure, 14 percentage points reflect frictions associated with nonemployment and job distribution mismatch, and 43 percentage points reflect the gradual adaptation of imported schooling and experience to the local labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoram Weiss & Robert M. Sauer & Menachem Gotlibovski, 2003. "Immigration, Search, and Loss of Skill," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 557-592, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:21:y:2003:i:3:p:557-592
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/374959
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
    2. Friedberg, Rachel M, 2000. "You Can't Take It with You? Immigrant Assimilation and the Portability of Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(2), pages 221-251, April.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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